Duct Tape Dispenser Patch by Superesse Straps: Hands-On Review

One of my favorite items to pack in any survival kit is duct tape. For me, it truly is one of those items that has a million and one uses. Okay, so that number may be on the high end and I have not kept track, but it certainly has a lot of uses. 

Because I think that it is so useful I do not mind stowing an entire roll of tape in my pack or vehicle. But for some people, an entire roll of duct tape is heavy, bulky, and takes up space. 

Duct Tape Dispenser Patch Review

Duct Tape Dispenser Patch

Too bad there isn’t an alternative way to carry duct tape…or is there? In this article, I will be taking a look at and reviewing the Duct Tape Dispenser Patch by Superesse Straps. If you like duct tape but do not want the hassle of an entire roll this dispenser may be right up your alley. Let’s see what this patch has to offer.

Tape

Can hold 4ft to 10ft of standard duct tape. But any tape that has a width of 2” or less will fit on the dispenser. 

Convenient to Carry 

The dispenser comes with two heavy-duty Velcro strips on the back. This allows for the dispenser to be easily carried on a ball cap, pack or stored in a vehicle. 

Not Just Tape

While this is designed as a tape dispenser it works as a handy way of organizing different types of cordages as well. From Kevlar cord, paracord, to fishing line, this patch is a convenient way of transporting tape or cordage.

Field Test

I have to be honest when I removed the dispenser from the box I was a little taken back because it is a very simple looking product.

It is a piece of rubber with two Velcro strips on the back. However, it wasn’t until I started using the dispenser that I realized simplicity and function go hand in hand. 

As I mentioned earlier, duct tape can be tricky to carry but it is so useful that in my opinion it should be carried. This dispenser splits the difference between carrying a full roll versus tape wrapped around other pieces of gear.

I grabbed my roll of duct tape and cut off roughly five feet of it. I then rewrapped it around the patch. The base of the Velcro sections acts like walls, keeping the tape centered and making it easier to wrap around the patch. 

After the tape was on I decided to add some cordage as well. I took roughly thirty feet of braided fishing line and wrapped it around the patch keeping it along the edge of the tape.

Depending on how much tape you use and its size, a lot of small-diameter cordage can be added. Being able to carry tape as well as cordage or fishing line makes the patch more versatile.    

The patch can be attached to any surface that has Velcro. This could be on a hat, shoulder, clothing, pack, or even in a vehicle. Or it could simply be carried in a pocket.

I did carry it on various surfaces such as my pack but I ended up putting it in my pocket for quite a while. It is barely noticeable in a pocket and having quick access to cordage and patching material was very handy. I was able to easily start a fire with a small roll of tape and patched a tear in one of my survival blankets.

If you are going to be doing a lot of repairs or needing a lot of tape, there is a way of using this patch that I like. Unwrap a length of tape, say one foot, and then stick the patch onto a Velcro surface with the tape hanging down. The patch holds the tape, keeping it from sticking to itself or unwanted surfaces while pieces can be conveniently cut off from the hanging end.  

Pros 

  • Compact 
  • Lightweight 
  • Easily organizes tape or cordage 
  • Easy to transport on a hat, pack, or in a pocket

Cons 

  • Costly for what it is

Extras

Superesse Straps has a whole line of survival-related items you may be interested in, paracord bracelets, micro kits, and other patches. They were kind enough to send along two additional items for me to take a look at.

The first is another Velcro patch with a tap table and morse code table on the front. These are two handy ways of carrying out discrete communications. A nice feature of this patch is that there is a small pocket cutout in the back of it. This pocket can be used as a secret compartment for carrying additional micro items, a stash of cash, or whatever you like.

The second item was a Saw Shim Tool. I thought this was an interesting little item. It is a small piece of steel with a hole punched out on each side and a row of saw teeth. This item has two uses. By threading cordage through each hole and creating a loop, it can be used as a micro saw for cutting or it can be used as a shim tool for unlocking certain items such as zip ties. 


Verdict 

I would like to quickly say that I do not think that this patch is expensive by any means but it does seem a bit pricy for what it is. However, when weighing that against the ability to carry two important items easily as this patch provides, I could be wrong. Having said that… 

After carrying this patch around for about a week I have concluded that I really like it. In my opinion, cordage and duct tape are important to carry because they are so useful.

While this patch will be carried on my pack most of the time, I like that I can grab it and shove it in a pocket at a moment’s notice. If you like having duct tape readily available but do not need an entire roll of it then I suggest taking a closer look at this innovative patch by Superesse Straps.

Thanks for reading! I would like to note that this is an American made product by a Veteran owned company, thank you Superesse Straps for the opportunity of trying out the Duct Tape Dispenser Patch.




Written by Bryan Lynch

Bryan grew up in the Midwest and spent every waking moment outdoors. Learning how to hunt, fish, read the land, and be self-reliant was part of everyday life. Eventually, he combined his passions for the outdoors, emergency preparedness, and writing. His goal was to spread positive information about this field. In 2019, Bryan authored the book Swiss Army Knife Camping and Outdoor Survival Guide. His second book, Paracord Projects For Camping and Outdoor Survival, is scheduled to be released on March 2, 2021. Read more of Bryan's articles.

Leave a Comment