Survival Gear Review: CZ 75 Pistol

When I was in a gun store waiting for an FFL transfer, I saw what I thought was a nice looking Browning Hi-Power in the case for a great price.   I asked to look at it and the gun felt right.  I checked the tag and it read, “CZ 75B”.

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CZ 75: Cheap Czech Steel

I had no idea what pistol I was holding at the time, but it had a good heft and a natural point.  I asked to see a nice FN BrowningCZ 75 Gun Review Hi-Power that was next to the CZ 75B, and it didn’t feel as good in my hands, and was almost twice the price.  I bought the CZ 75B on a whim and my love for this cheap Czech pistol was sealed when I put five magazines of 124 gr. ball down range and it shot like a laser.

The CZ 75 is a high-capacity service pistol designed and built in the9mm Survival Pistol Czech Republic by CZUB, and currently imported by CZ USA.  It’s a full sized pistol, 8” long with a 4.7” barrel and weighing 2.47 pounds (about the same weight as an M1911).  The CZ 75 features a steel frame and slide.  Standard capacity is 16 + 1 rounds, but there are magazines that can hold 20 rounds.  The pistol is single action/double action, with a frame mounted safety, and has a manual of arms similar to an M1911 or Hi-Power, but with double action capability. It can be carried cocked and locked (condition one).  The CZ 75B has a firing pin block, a feature added in the 1990s to prevent discharge on a hammer drop with the safety on.  The pistol can be placed in half-cock, but this is only for manual decocking and field stripping, and is not a safety position, nor does it allow you to fully decock the pistol.  There is a decocking version of the CZ 75, the CZ 75BD that has a decocking lever instead of a manual safety, which allows the pistol to operate like most service 9mms, with a double action first shot and single action follow up shots.

The basic design of the CZ 75 makes it easily mistakable for a Browning Hi-Power.  The layout of the pistol are similar, as both Survival Pistoluse the linkless cam system of the Hi-Power.  There are also details of the CZ 75 that are reminiscent of the M1911, like the recoil spring guide, which is short and uncaptured.

The CZ 75 also has a host of unique features that sets the pistol apart from other high capacity 9mm pistols.  The CZ 75 grip fixes one of the major issues with the Browning Hi-Power; the Hi-Power’s tendency to bite the web of hand.  When comparing grip profiles, the CZ 75 has a slightly more raked grip, with a rounder front strap and a generous tang.  My only contention is that it should feature some checkering on the front strap, but it is very ergonomic and does not bite the user’s hand. Early CZ 75s had a spurred hammer that had the potential to cause hammer bite, but CZ 75Bs have a ring hammer.

The CZ 75 features internal slide rails, meaning the slide is held by the frame, the reverse of most semi-auto pistols.  This CZ 75 Survival Pistolprovides a tighter slide to frame lock-up, which provides better mechanical accuracy.  The pistol is packaged with a factory test target; mine showed five hits in a 3 inch group at 25 meters.  While mechanical accuracy is excellent, practical accuracy ranges from acceptable to good.   The weight versus recoil impulse of the 9mm round makes it a soft shooting handgun, but points of contention are the sights and trigger pull.

The factory sights are small, low profile service pistol sights, with a three dot pattern.  My CZ 75B has dots painted with photo-luminescent paint, which absorb light and then radiate it back in low light.  I’m not impressed with these “poor man’s night sights” in the dark or light, and plan on upgrading my personal weapon to some Trijicons with real tritium illumination (also Crimson Trace is available).  The trigger pull on the CZ 75 is also long and stiff, even in single action. The addition of the firing pin block on the CZ 75B model worsened the trigger pull. There are aftermarket parts and smiths who can make the trigger a beautiful thing, but for a service pistol this is something I recommend against. I did a 5,000 round trigger job and find it to be quite serviceable now, or I have adapted to the pull. Either way, the trigger on a stock CZ 75 is not a match affair.

Another unique feature of the CZ 75 is the magazine brake spring. Inside the magazine well is a bowed flat spring that applies CZ 75 Pistol Review tension to the magazine body.  If you press the magazine release on an empty mag, the tension from the spring will cause the magazine to drop approximately half way out.  This allows you to retain the magazine by manually removing it and then replacing it with a full magazine.  In dry training with the CZ 75B, I did not find the magazine brake to be a problem, but in live fire I hated it. I desperately wanted drop free mags.  There are a couple solutions to this. One is to remove the the spring, flatten it, and replace it.  Another is to purchase a flat spring (a blank filler really) and install it in the magazine well.  I opted to go with installing a flat spring, and have been happy with drop free mags ever since.

The CZ 75 has gained popularity over the years and now has a host of variations, as well as additional calibers. The CZ 75B can Survival Pistolbe had in .40 S&W, with several finishes. There is the decocking model, the CZ 75BD, a compact model, and the CZ 85B, an ambidextrous version of the CZ 75.  There is the CZ-97 in .45 ACP, in B and BD versions.  There are also competition and tactical models, like the CZ 75 SP-01 and the CZ 75 Tactical Sport.

The parts I would stock up on would be the slide release lever (the barrel pivots on this part), recoil springs, extractor springs, guide rod, and as many magazines as I could afford.  Factory magazines are outstanding, but MEC-GAR brand have also functioned 100% for me, and were at one time the factory magazine original equipment manufacturer.

The CZ 75 is an interesting pistol and certainly one that I enjoy.   I keep it loaded, condition one, with Speer 124 gr. Gold Dots Survival Pistolsand keep a spare magazine in the case.  I feel it’s a pistol I can trust.  I certainly got a lot of gun for my money, and I think that’s what the CZ 75 represents, a good value.   If you can find one used, you’re even better off.  LTC Jeff Cooper called the CZ 75, “the worlds best service 9mm” or something similar, and used the design aesthetic as the basis for the Bren Ten. If you’re looking for a rugged service 9mm on a budget, I think that it would be hard to make a better choice.

All Photos by Mr. Smashy (See Mr. Smashy’s Flickr Gallery)

Also see (CZ 75 Family – The Ultimate Combat Handgun)



Written by Mr. Smashy

Mr. Smashy has been shooting competitively for more than 15 years. Scouted from a junior club rifle team for the state team, he has won state championships in several events over his years. Mr. Smashy currently competes in NRA Highpower, USPSC, Action Pistol, among others. Mr. Smashy has excellent knowledge of US service rifles, reloading, and marksmanship. Read his full interview here. Read more of Mr. Smashy's articles.

54 thoughts on “Survival Gear Review: CZ 75 Pistol”

  1. Very good article. I have always wondered about these pistols espeically since the price seems right. I have never owned one nor do I know anyone who has owned one so this review really helps. The browning Hi point definitly is an appealing gun but I stopped buying browning years ago cause you are paying so much just for the name( in my opinion, like other well know brands.)

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  2. Good review of a very good gun and if you need a left handed version it is the CZ 85B same gun with ambi controls and ajustable night sights.

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  3. I have a CZ75 p-06 (compact in 40 s&w) for my everyday carry. It came with tritium sites and I installed CT laser grips. By far my favorite pistol to carry. It is a little hefty, but it makes for great recoil management. Great review, love the idea with the magazine brake spring.

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  4. I have fired a CZ 550 rifle in .375 H&H mag and really liked it. I have heard a lot of good things about CZ products. While I don't personally like the DA first/SA after scheme for pistols (I just don't seem to be able to get consistent firing during the change from DA to SA – could be just me, but there it is) it sounds like CZ has fixed that by allowing the 75 to be carried 'locked and cocked'. One of my few complaints with the Sig has been the inability to safely carry that way since it has a decocker but not a safety.

    Personally, if I'm carrying a full size auto, it won't likely be a 9, but that does look like a good pistol. Their "half drop" of the magazine sounds like a really good idea that just doesn't work out as well as it sounds. Thanks for the tip on the remedy.

    While I don't mind paying a fare price for a solid product, I do object to paying an extra 25% or more for a brand name. It sounds like CZ is not one of "THOSE" brand names. Sounds like another good value from the folks at CZ.
    Thank you for the review.

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    • I don't like the DA/SA setup of most semi-pistols either, that long creepy DA pull is usually over twice the weight of the SA follow up pull. Training is required and it can be overcome, but I've gravitated towards weapons systems with a consistent trigger pull throughout it's course of fire. The learning curve on the CZ 75 is pretty flat; weapons handling is rather easy and pistol marksmanship does not require any special adjustments for DA trigger pulls. Teaching second strike is a possibility with the CZ 75, but I'd stick to the basics of the Immediate Action Drill.

      I think if this article was about the "Sig 75B" everyone would have one and it would be a sought after pistol for those in the know. But as it stands you get a slightly rough but very serviceable and reliable pistol from the Czech for around $500 new that will frequently sell out of the big online dealers, and a similar pistol, the Sig P226 can be had for under $800, and while there are some major differences between these two pistols (steel vs alloy frames, safety vs decocker, etc) you are basically buying a full sized service 9mm. If I could do it again I'd have purchased a CZ 75B in .40 S&W, a larger caliber that I already reload for, but I bought a used gun and I think every survival armory should have at least one 9mm anyhow. Accuracy is outstanding it does what I require it to do for me. I would definitely consider it a good value, even paying full fare. I may pick up another one just to have a spare, even though I'm pretty Glock committed.

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  5. Mr. Smashy,
    I replaced the factory sights on my Colt Combat Commander with the Trijicon night sights for a consistent low light capability. I was amazed that they also seemed to improve the sight picture during bright light as well. I'm impressed with the sights. I've heard mention the possibility of the glow giving your position away but that doesn't seem like a major concern for most situations.
    I would like your opinion on whether or not that is a problem.
    Thanks.

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    • I've never considered it a problem. All my defensive handguns have night sights, except for my G35, and the faint glow is not visible from the other side of the muzzle. I work with SWAT operators from a few different agencies and they consider a good pair of night sights standard equipment on a duty pistol. Most patrolmen carry pistols with night sights standard issue, as it's usually part of whatever company is doing the LE pistol package.

      If someone is standing behind you with a scoped rifle and can see your pistol night sights, you might have a problem, but the night sights were really the least of your problems in that situation.

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  6. Very good review! I have never shot a CZ but they seem to be of very high quality. In fact when I buy a S/S or over/under shotgun it will probably be a CZ. The reviews on them are always very favorable! YMMV.

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  7. It seems like a very good gun. My own personal-prejudice is that I probably SHOULD get a a 9mm but when I do, it will be a cheap Keltec or other "ghetto-gun" to shoot cheap/available ammo. Right now, If I could spend $500+ on another firearm, it's a toss-up between a Taurus Judge .410/.45LC ( 3 rattler-encounters hiking this year, so far) or a Saiga 12 gauge and a few spare mags. (Kalashnikov-action semi-auto shotgun). My opinion, worth exactly what you paid for it 🙂

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    • Buy some rat shot for your existing pistol if snakes are an issue (9mm is very cheap). Put two/three rat shot loads then followed by some standard ammo. If the snake does not retreat after being peppered with rat shot(s) they usually "coil" up in self defense mode and then you can hit them with a regular round or another round of rat shot and finish them off.

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      • I carry rat shot in my Ruger .45 Colt for just that reason (actually, it has a .45 ACP cylinder in it – the rat shot wouldn't cycle the semi-auto). For walking in the evening, I'm prepared for snakes with any number of legs – first three are shot for snakes, wild dogs, skunks, etc – the last 3 (a Ruger can be safely carried with all 6 loaded because of the transfer bar system; only five in most wheel guns) are for vermin not impressed with rat shot. They are loaded with Hornady's JHPs. I don't have to be too concerned with a missed shot going through a wall and hitting someone's child – it gives me a freedom of action that is quite reassuring.

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        • Skunks….. Never shot one. Run a few times. Even shot ones will spray the area.

          Understand the rabies issues though. Good ideas.

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    • Don't want to quibble but if "ghetto-gun" is another term for "Saturday Night Special" I think you're giving Kel-Tec a bad rap. They are relatively inexpensive but I've used and known others who use them and they are solid, dependable weapons. Their repair policy is simple – if it doesn't work they'll fix or replace it forever! Not too shabby a warranty. No pocket pistol, be it Ruger or Smith or Kel-Tec or anybody else, will shoot like a full size weapon but I wouldn't carry a "cheap" pistol if I had any other choice (not inexpensive – just cheap). I agree with the Judge, by the way but I like revolvers and I am a .45 bigot so my opinion is not exactly unbiased. That said, during the summer in Houston, the little P11 is often the only weapon my attire allows me to conceal. The little .380 Kel-Tec makes is even smaller (although I'd choose the P9 in 9mm) and makes a great purse gun for my daughter. She doesn't like the recoil of the P9 (all pocket pistols recoil a bit more than a full size) but finds the P3 just fine. Choose what fits your needs but I tend to distinguish between cheap and inexpensive. I've own a few "cheap" guns (one which was quite expensive, actually) and I was never comfortable that they would perform when needed. That's a worry I don't need.

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  8. I like the 9mm for the price of ammo (like to shoot a lot), but the SR9C is so compact, I use it for my concealed carry now. I'd like to carry my HK .45, but too bulky. The SR9C holds 10 rounds in the short clip, and the second clip with grip extender holds 17, basically with a mag change the grip becomes the same size as a full size auto, just the shorter barrel. Load it with Magtech HP +P's, and I am confident that I am well covered. I had a Smith 9mm a few years ago, had to sell it, along with a couple of others, I really regret letting that one go. I think I am going to look into the SR40c, Ruger said they weren't going to make one… guess what??? 2 months after i buy the 9mm, they put out a 40 compact. Just my luck. Fortunately, my wife loves the 9 🙂

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  9. Nice review, a few years back (more like 15 years) I looked into CZ and found them to be sub-standard, but I may have to check out the new breed. If you are looking for another 9mm for a great deal, check out the Ruger SR series. I picked up the SR9C (compact) for just over $400 and I am completely blown away. absolutely the best 9mm I have owned and a great price.

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  10. Good article, couldn't agree more. CZ has been making guns for a loooong time, and they are damn good at it. Working in a gun shop, you get an eye for garbage, something decent, and things that will last. The IMI (or IWI) baby eagle (jericho) pistols are very close representations to the CZ 75s; both of which, in my opinion, are "boringly accurate." As in, the gun doesn't miss, you do. I've shot the CZs many times, and own a baby eagle. Outside of being built like and having the weight of a fire hydrant, they are an awesome shooting pistol. Would love to see more accessories for the b. eagle (serpa holsters, etc).

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  11. I had a full size 1911 in .45ACP that I carried SOB (small of back). Problem was that if I sat very long (like a long drive) the pressure of the weapon on my spine put my legs to sleep. I had a doctor friend point out that if I fell on the pistol my back was likely to get really damaged. That was sort of the end of my conceal carry for a full size 1911. My combat commander is much better for carry but, of course, recoil is worse than on a full size. Too bad the bulk of the full size guns make carry so difficult.
    I want a Ruger LCP with 18 rounds of .50AE and no recoil! I'd even pay a premium for that gun. Unfortunately, I don't think even Ruger can alter the laws of Physics for us.

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  12. This is a great article on the basics of the venerable CZ75B. CZ has slowly been gaining more and more of a following. Some observations:

    The CZ85B is the ambi version of the 75B as is noted above. The sights are the same. The CZ85 Combat is the ambi-85B with (1) slim profile adjustable target sights, (2) trigger travel adjustment and (3) has the CZ Omega trigger system. The CZ75B Omega, now discontinued, has the trigger system that took the "scrinch" out of the CZ tigger pull. In SA, most CZ's have a single or double "scrinch" as the trigger is pulled. The Omega system converted this to a smooth glide. The slide has Omega on it and the Greek Omega symbol. The CZ75D Compact uses a Novak rear sight, has 14 round clips (most 75Bs are 15 or 16 rounds, depending upon date of issue), rubber grips and a light weight, "combat commander" size frame. For honorable mention in the lighter calibers, I have CZ83s in both 380 (12 + 1) and 32 acp (15 + 1). They are full ambi, including the clip release. The latter is in polished blue. These have the most buttery smooth trigger pulls that I have ever encountered.

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  13. I've just never been a fan of the 9mm as a primary sidearm, I will always choose .45acp as my primary choice. But with that being said the CZ75 is a great choice for 9mm fans on a budget and a few women I know who are avid shooters prefer it over the Baretta 92 for grip comfort. But as I've stated in alot of my posts, no matter the gun or caliber you choose if you don't train with it and practice it ain't worth squat!

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  14. I have not fired a CZ pistol, but if you are on a budget and looking for a nice handgun. FN FNP9 – 4" da/sa are now selling for 385.00-400.00 US. I picked one up Monday and was well satisfied with it. I was looking for something as a backup. I paid 428.00 with tax and received 3 -10rnd mags and 2 – 16 round mags with it. I m using 124g +p federal HST ammo. The FN FNP 40 – for those wanting the .40 S&W are the same price.

    My daily carry is a hk45 or (change of pace) Springfield 1911 MIL SPEC model 5" (very hard to come by and a sweet shooting handgun) – 6 mags w/winchester bonded PDX1 230g. my current back up is a FN five-seven, but I like to leave it for the wife (60% less recoil then a 9mm)

    I have been looking to get a CZ 52 in 7.62x 25.

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  15. Hello,

    Just to let you know, I recently purchased the SR40c on what i would call a "whim." I went into this place for a Glock in 40 that I could every day carry. After talking with the guy behind the counter and seeing the price of the Ruger which is 150 dollors less then Glocks Gen 4 I decided to go with this gun. It everyone who has shot it says it feels much easier to controll the the Glock and is just as easy to hide under a shirt. The kicker for me was the out of the box accuracy. I pulled my first shot (which is usual for me) and centered the rest dead center of the target at the better pat of 40 feet (basically 12 meters if your used to the army way of measuring distance.) Love this gun ma, i do not think you will be disapointed. It will cause you a touch of shock if you havent shot a higher caliber in a whil but after a few pulls you will ease into it.

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  16. I recently got the chance to fire off my first semi-auto pistols. I got a chance to fire a M1911, a Glock 9mm (i cant remember the model), a Walther, as well as a GLORIOUS CZ-75 SP-01.

    Gotta say, the M1911 felt like i was holding a tool. But when I held that CZ it felt like it was coming right out of my arm!

    Best part is you can get a CZ-75 SP-01 Tactical. It comes with tritium night sights, an ambidextrous de-cocker (in leiu of a manual safety) and it can come in either 9mm or .40 S&W.

    Beautiful pistol.

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  17. I've owned a CZ75 ever since the early 80s when I was stationed in Germany. I have put thousands of rounds through it and have never had a problem. It is very comfortable to shoot, in fact, all 3 of my children learned to shoot with this weapon when they were 7 or 8 years of age. My 2 girls, now 28 and 29 keep asking me when I'm going to give it to them. They love it too. My youngest wants me to teach her son to shoot it when he is old enough. Thank God I have a few years before that happens (he's only 9 months). Maybe I'll leave it to him when I depart this ol' world. hahaha

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  18. I discovered CZ's in a very similar way though my experience was with a 550 rifle.
    The history and quality of these firearms amazed me and I've been sold ever since, plan on buying a 75 pistol soon enough. great article.

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  19. Nice review. The CZ-75 is an excellent pistol that is widely overlooked.

    As previously mentioned in this thread, you can also buy the "Kadet" 22LR conversion that makes practice/plinking with this piece extremely affordable. The "Kadet" was designed and built by CZ to the same standards as the basic gun, so no problems arise with integration.

    Only additional comment I would make to your review is to emphasize the point that this is a full-size piece. The grips might be a bit large for smaller/female hands. You can get lower-profile grips: http://czcustom.com/CZ-75-85-TS-Grips-Aluminum-Pl

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  20. My everyday carry is a CZ-75B, and this review is pretty much in keeping with my experiences. I have to say that I haven't had the issues with the trigger, but as I bought it used and it had clearly spent some time with a gunsmith (barrel was ported), it was probably the recipient of a trigger job. I'm VERY happy with this pistol in every way. I opted to replace the grips with Hogues, and am very happy with that.

    One downside not discussed in the review is the minimum of after market accessories. Holsters are tricky to find. I have been looking for a decent paddle holster but the only one I could find was the Fobus. Frankly, I don't like them. Also, if you want a tactical light on your pistol? I have yet to find an option for a tac rail to be added to the CZ.

    That said, the downsides are so minimal that I still love this pistol with all my heart. I appreciate mentioning the modification to make the mags drop free. I didn't know that, and hadn't even looked to do something like that, but will do so now!

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  21. Just bought a cz75 "pre-B" with spur hammer and longer slide rails.nice blueing.I owed a friend a 9mm from a previous trade, and was having second thoughts about trading him my green ruger sr-9.The price was right so I bought the cz for my friend,I did a "comparison shoot" putting a magfull through the ruger then a magfull through the cz.100 rds later, I have no second thoughts; my friend will love his new ruger!

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  22. Agree with this. Kel-Tec makes quality products. They may be inexpensive, but they are also hard to find due to limited production combined with their popularity. I had to drive an hour-and-a-half to find a gun shop with a PF9 in stock. I am very pleased with it. Shot about 150 rounds with no malfunctions straight out of the box, and it's both a serious weapon and small and light for carry. If Kel-Tecs were easier to get, I think they'd be one of the most popular brands in the country.

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  23. Brand New 2 1/2 yrs ago, my 75B Ambi S&W 40 is the most accurate semi-auto I have have owned or even shot. I don't have those other semi's now, but I would trade them all to keep this one. I am in love with it. I like the heft, the grip is perfect for my hands left or right, and intuitive to point. Now I want a pair, one for each hand. GF wants 1 in a 9mm though, so that will be the next one I am thinking.

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  24. Al, not sure who told you the CZ brand was sub standard. Even back in the communist days they produced some very well made handguns. I remember seeing tests done on the in the 80's with that generation CZ75 and it was well liked by unit armourers and operators.

    While it's true the old era communist block countries did churn out some rubbish, the Czeq's were very much the exception with their home produced kit.

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  25. If it's an affordable Hi-Power you're after then look no further than the Hungarian Hi-Power clone, by FEG. The company is kaput, but they can still be found for $250-$350 or so. So what's the catch? What's the one tiny difference that still makes Brownings worth their price? There's not one, honestly! I didn't want to believe it either, but my own exhaustive research and testaments of other highly satisfied owners has proven it – 100% parts interchangeability for 1/4 the price!

    Since Hi-Powers only ever achieved moderate US success during their hay-day, knock-offs were even less successful, but these are worth snapping-up when you find them!
    NOTE: you've got to make sure that you're buying the correct model, because later in their production cycle S&W got involved, somehow, and mucked thing up for everyone. The differences can be found in the trigger cam and the slide cut, but you'll have to collect the details from other forums. Most any slide marked "Mauser" is a safe bet.

    check-out this link: http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?p=91645

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  26. I believe the keltec p11 and p9's are two of the best "service" sized pistol for conceal carry. I've never had any problems with it or the sub 2k. I will agree w/ captbart that they are absolutely no fun to plink with. Very uncomfortable to shoot, but that's a tradeoff for a 9mm that comes in under a pound. I found a remedy for this by purchasing Turkish Canik55 tp9 which is a full size service gun to use when concealment is not so important. They are all tools in the toolbox.

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  27. I own a CZ 75, bought in 1980 at the age of 20, on the advice of a soldier in the Special Forces of the South African recon group. I was a paratrooper in the South African army and used it in combat.
    I trained lots of people and children with it from 4 years old. It is a beautiful, functional, reliable piece of equipment. It is extremely well designed. It is highly accurate, user friendly, easy to strip and clean,(a small child can do it). Small children can handle its recoil easily. Both hands on the handle naturally!
    There is more than 50 000 rounds through this gun and it still shoots straight, I shot in my lifetime a lot of different handguns and of different calibers, makes, sizes etc. All Factors considered, there is nothing like the CZ 75. Great article! My gun has a very good trigger from start and I bended the backing plate flat so that the magazines can fall free when released.

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  28. CZ 52 in 7.62×25 is an awesome pistol i use it as my carry gun when im in the woods 7.62×25 hollow points will stop anything it has wayyy more power than a 45 when that hollow point opens up

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  29. I solved the problem in a slightly less expensive way. I punched out the two roll pins holding the spring and removed it. Problem solved drop free magazines. BTW the CZ 75 is one the most copied handguns in the world. There are some very inexpensive knock offs coming out of Turkey made by Canik. They are sold under the Canik and the Tristar names for under $350 at Academy sports. They are available in 40 S&W if you want a bit more horsepower than a 9MM. For that matter EAA imports an Italian made knock off that is available in 45 ACP or 10mm as well if you're insistent on even more fire power. As to the strength of the Canik knockoffs, I used Tristar C100 (9mm compact) for a 4 day defensive handgun class at Front Sight this past May with not a single hang up. A number of the other shooters were wanting to know more about the little 15 shot pistol that I got for $259 at a pawn shop that went through over 600 rounds in 4 days without a single issue.

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  30. Try a Tristar C-100 from the Turkish manufacturer Canik and imported by Century Arms. It's about the size of a Glock 19 but to me feels a lot more comfortable in the hand. It IS available in 9mm or 40 S&W for under $350 depending on the retailer. It even comes with 2 magazines. I put over 600 rounds through my 9mm at Front Sight over a 4 day period this past spring without having to clean or lube it. Not a single hang up of any type. I out shot a lot of people with more expensive firearms. I started out with my full sized stainless CZ-75B, but went to the compact Tristar after the first hour or two of training because I was tired of the weight of the larger gun. I have to admit that I have or have had multiple 1911s, multiple Glocks, the aforementioned CZ 75B and a couple of knockoffs from different manufacturers. I have even owned a couple of Sigs. The ergonomics on the CZ frame is such that the new Sig E2 frame design shows a VERY strong influence from the CZ. For those who are weight conscious CZ and Tanfoglio (their prime copier) both make polymer frame versions. The aforementioned Tristar is an alloy frame compact that uses 15 round magazines.

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  31. If you like the ergonomics of the CZ and the horsepower of the 45 ACP cartridge why not get both? EAA has been importing Tanfoglio made copies of the CZ in 45 ACP under the Witness brand for over 20 years. Have the best of both worlds, the ergonomics, higher capacity, and double action of the CZ with the horsepower of the 45 ACP cartridge. At one point in time, they were even selling conversion kits that allowed one frame to fire 9mm,40 S&W, 10mm and 45 ACP simply by changing slides, barrels and magazines.

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  32. If you like the CZ-75 action but want a pistol with a tactical rail, Century Arms is importing a knock off of the CZ made by NATO manufacturer Canik that is available with a light rail. I agree on the holster front. Here's how I solved the problem. I needed a poly holster for use at Front Sight and they didn't have one that fit a CZ in stock. I bought an Uncle Mike's Tactical holster for a Beretta 92, removed the tension screws, heated it up with a butane torch lighter (just enough to make the plastic warm enough to bend, but no more) opened it up, shoved a piece of metal inside that was roughly the width of the CZ frame, and then closed it up and reinserted the screws. 15 minutes later I had a poly paddle holster that fit my CZ well enough to not rattle, allow it to be dropped, or so tight that the pistol couldn't be drawn in a hurry. I have done this with Blackhawk Serpa holsters as well.

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  33. Nah, get a CZ 75, the machining is much better and it costs the same.

    I put thousands of rounds out of my CZ 75 BD, and its much better than my array of 9mms except for my Sig.

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  34. As a long time 1911 Shooter, Hands down THE only 9mm I like, Carry and Trust, with modern defense loads you have a high capacity life saver! Accurate! Easy to shoot, Reliable. over 2k rounds only problems were with students who limp wristed or griped so tight that they hit the mag release. I work in a major metropolitan area so capacity is nice, follow up shots amazing, double taps at 7yards 1.5in all day long! Amazing how people say a 9mm is to weak but will carry a snub 38, No magic bullets people! contrary to myths one .45 my not stop a meth head!!! Shoot until they are no longer a threat. Best Fighting 9mm period.

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  35. LOOK AT RAMLITE, YOUTUBE IT. RED LASER & TAC LIGHT. MINE WORKS GREAT DEAD ON AT 7 YDS. OUT OF THE BOX. ABOUT $120.-$125. ONLY ONE I KNOW HOPE THIS HELPS

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  36. The Kadet .22LR conversion makes the '75B into an almost unbelievably accurate practice weapon. As a full-size 9mm it's incomparable. My only nit is the different manual of arms between the 75B (safety) and the P-01, PCR, and RAMI (all decockers). I don't want to spring for a decocker 75B. What a great problem to have, though…four seriously-great guns!

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  37. I bought mine in 1989 while in Germany and it is not marked as a B model. Am curious to know the plain CZ 75 markings mean that it is an A model or if it is a B model? I have the original box and receipt and there is no B on either. Any info would be helpful. The serial number a D series and less than 5000 so if that helps to ID it maybe one of you can fill in the blanks.

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