Survival Gear Review: Hennessy Hammock Expedition

Staying off the ground is not just an important part of back country camping, it can also be a matter of life or death if you are outside the sphere of assistance or in a survival situation.  The ground can literally suck the heat from your body.  Enter, the No products found..

About the Hammock

Model: No products found.
Height Limit: 6′ tall / 180 cm
Weight Limit: 250 lbs / 115 kg
Weight of Hammock 2 lbs 9 oz / 1160 g

Click to watch review – Hennessy Hammock Expedition Zip

Conclusion:

The Pro’s

I have used this No products found. multiple times in the back-country of the Rocky Mountains and here are some things that I like about this hammock. SHTF Survival Hammock The hammock is very light weight compared to almost any tent and has no tent poles, which can be bulky in your pack.  The No products found. is very compact-able and fits well into your camping pack or bug out bag. The mosquito netting is a nice feature depending on your location and provides great ventilation while protecting you from small insect like predators. Quick and easy to set up, I can set up the hammock in less than five minutes (more like three minutes). I usually spend more time looking for the perfect trees. The hammock is great for uneven ground, as long as you have several trees to choose from you can literally camp on the side of a mountain or a hill in this hammock.  It comes with a rain fly which is key to protecting you from the elements, as well as keeping your body heat within the hammock .  It also has a paracord draw string across the top of the hammock to keep the mosquito netting and rain fly off of you, while providing a place for the sliding mesh gear bag for your headlamp, pistol, glasses, etc.  The Hennessy Hammock Expedition also has additional draw strings so that you can stake open up your hammock to provide more internal space, which is nice.

The Con’s

The cons are that you need to have trees available to you or you’re screwed.  The No products found. only fits one person, so this is not the SHTF Survival Hammockideal family bug out tent.  The rain fly that comes with the hammock is small and would not protect you very well in severe weather conditions.  A sleeping pad seems necessary to keep your body heat from escaping beneath you.  It does not come with any tent stakes to stake out your rain fly.

Some recommendations I would make are to purchase the additional No products found..  It is very large and provides the necessary protection from the whatever Mother Nature throws at you.  Hennessy also offers Snake Skins, a tube-like sheath which attaches to each side of the hammock for quick storage and fast set-up and tear-down.  This way you don’t have to try and fold up or stuff your hammock into a cinch sack.  I would also add lightweight tent stakes to stake out the rain fly and hammock.

And the most important feature of all, I get a better nights sleep in a hammock than I do in a tent on a sleeping pad.

Video by SurvivalCache.com Team
Photos by:
jon_beard
bicyclerust
utspoolup



Joel Jefferson
Written by Joel Jefferson

Joel is one of the original founders of SurvivalCache.com. After college, he joined the USMC where he served as an (0302) Marine Infantry Officer. Joel is an avid outdoorsman and spends much of his free time in the mountains. Joel’s hobby is researching survival gear & weapons as well as prepping. Read his full interview here. Read more of Joel's articles.

20 thoughts on “Survival Gear Review: Hennessy Hammock Expedition”

  1. I love hammock camping, but if you are worried about losing heat in a survival situation., the hammock is probably worse than the ground unless you also packed good underquilts. (I vastly prefer underquilts to pads in a hammock, both for comfort and warmth)

    The wind moving underneath you will make you colder much faster than the ground, and its pretty easy to make a pile of leaves, or even snow that will insulate you on the ground.

    Reply
    • yes but you can also pile leaves up past bottom of hammock and let it hang lower to aid in surrounding the outside in pile of leaves.. helps a ton just to block wind.. also instead of quilt you can add a 8 by 10 tarp from home depot underneath and fill the inside of it with leaves aswell.. many ways to stop wind if you think out side the box

      Reply
  2. Once you get the mechanics of getting in and out of the hammock it is very comfortable. I would suggest checking out the line of hammocks Grand Trunk has to offer. I have the double nylon parachute hammock. They have a higher weight limit. I slept outside in it last fall many nights, once when a cold front came through and the temperature dropped 20 degrees to the mid 30's.
    I tell people that you are cheating yourself in life by not having a hammock.

    Reply
  3. You can use your sleeping bag as an underquilt. The underquilt is not an option in cold weather. I prefer a pad between me and the hammock, but don't need it. The best part about this set up is, with practice, you can get the fly up in less than a minute and start drying off if you're already wet, or stay dry if you catch a weather change soon enough.

    Reply
  4. I have been sleeping in hammocks for years. But I prefer my bivi-sack in light weight net hammock. That way in the many place I can not find tree that can support me I can sleep on the ground. The bivi-sack is not all that roomy but it is light weight and all I need it for is to sleep. If not in it I am on the move. There are many great hammock tents out there. Just keep in mind that you always need a a pair of good trees. Or you have worthless weight in your gear bag.

    Reply
  5. It looks like a good system, but like the cons point out it is not workable outside of woodland areas. Out here on the Great Plains where most of our woodlands are near rivers or in the eastern part of the region this system would be useless. We have not trees out on grasslands of the various prairies to attach the slings to. Something a little more versatile would work better here. Something that could be used as a hammock in wooded areas and as a single person or two person tent in others would work best.

    Reply
  6. I have one of these hammocks and they work great. The review is spot on. Get the extra stuff – hex rain fly and the insulation. I use the insulation even in the summer.

    Reply
  7. Ok so the Clark Hammock can double as a single person tent are their any others. Like I said I live on the Great Plains and we have limited woodland spaces out here. As my userid suggest I live in Kansas. Now the area around my part is more forested than other parts, but if I needed to travel far in a grid down situation to find help for my family I would need something that could work either as a hammock or a tent and since at the moment I weigh a bit more than 250 I need a system rated to handle a little bit more than 300. Won't say my height, but let's just say I am working on losing half of me and hopefully never finding that half again. In my fitness plan I am working in camping, not trunk or vehicular camping, but living out of a pack style and I need something I can stow in my pack that takes up little room.

    Reply
    • There are a great many lite-weight tents on the market. The general rule is that they are expensive. I have a Big Agnes Seedhouse SL-1, weighs about 2 1/2 lbs. packs very small. Also use Big Agnes sleeping bag system. The pad fits into a pouch on the bottom of the bag. I have camped in 24 degree weather and stayed warm. A lite weight tarp helps during wet weather. My tent, bag and pad weigh about 7 to 8 lbs.

      Reply
  8. I don't like using a hammock because my sleeping bag bunches up rather badly in one and getting out seems the only easy way to readjust it. I imagine that a sleeping pad or underquilt would do the same. Try getting dressed or undressed in a hammock, especially in a snowstorm. My dog won't settle down in one and being stepped on all night long seemingly every five minutes isn't any fun, and he hates being chained to the ground as do I! Even staked down, a hammock sways especially in a strong wind, and using a campfire for extra heat is not a good idea because if the wind blows embers up into your hammond/sleeping bag then you'll have a fun time getting unzipped from your bag especially if you've rolled in your sleep and your bag is smoking! Tents can be sprayed with fire retardents but the open-netting of a hammock makes this useless, and won't stop snow from blowing up under the covering tarp. Also, there is no room for your gear unless you like it piled on top of you!

    Reply
  9. I use my hammock a lot. I have an ENO (Eagle Nest Outfitters), hammock, rainfly and bugnet. I am in the middle of making my own underquilt. I just want to address some peoples concerns they are commenting with. Hopefully help a few people get the right setup. As far as insulation goes the underquilt is the way to go. The underquilt is suspended below the hammock and provides insulation while minimizing condensation issues. If you put something between you and the hammock it will not function as well. This is due to the insulation being crushed by your body weight. With that being said I have slept in my hammock with a 20 degree sleeping bag and no underquilt down to 17 degrees. I was cold but not cold enough that I couldn't sleep.

    I saw someone mentioned that their legs hurt when sleeping in the hammock. The trick here is to sleep diagonally in the hammock. This will make you lay flat and not strain your legs or knees. Another alternative is to sleep on your side, if you like to curl up when you sleep.

    Gear storage can be a problem at times but there are ways to deal with this problem. Numerous companies sell gear slings that rig with your hammock to keep you gear under you. Recently I went on a multi-day mountain bike ride using my hammock system. It rained almost every day. When my gear was rigged I took my hiking pack (towed in a small trailer while biking) and clipped it to the same tree my hammock was hanging from. This kept my gear off the ground and dry by using the bags rainfly to cover it. I kept my other gear under the hammocks rainfly. Was dry and warm while in my hammock and under the rainfly even with 10mph winds one day.

    With some practice and the right gear, hammock survival can be comfortable and quick to set up.
    Give hammocks multiple attempts until you get it right!

    Reply
  10. I use my hammock a lot. I have an ENO (Eagle Nest Outfitters), hammock, rainfly and bugnet. I am in the middle of making my own underquilt. I just want to address some peoples concerns they are commenting with. Hopefully help a few people get the right setup. As far as insulation goes the underquilt is the way to go. The underquilt is suspended below the hammock and provides insulation while minimizing condensation issues. If you put something between you and the hammock it will not function as well. This is due to the insulation being crushed by your body weight. With that being said I have slept in my hammock with a 20 degree sleeping bag and no underquilt down to 17 degrees. I was cold but not cold enough that I couldn't sleep.

    Reply

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