Survival Gear Review: SureFire G2X Pro

The Surefire G2X Pro is a polymer-bodied (Nitrolon) version of the 6PX Pro.  It is the replacement for the G2 LED, now discontinued, and heir apparent to the standard G2.  We put it through the paces at SurvivalCache to see if it lived up to the SureFire name.

SureFire G2X Pro: New Survival Staple

The SureFire G2X Pro has an anodized aluminum bezel, Nitolon body, and polycarbonate lens. The LED emitter produces two SureFire G2X Pro Reviewlevels of illumination, 200 and 15 lumens, with a runtime of 2.0 and 45 hours, respectively.  The beam shape is very good; a nice hotspot with good throw and plenty of side spill to illuminate the surrounding area.

Comparatively, the G2X Pro is very similar to a incandescent G2.  The Survival Flashlightbodies are the same diameter, use use the same P/G series tailcaps, and they have the same bezel diameters.  They are nearly the same length (the G2X is .10 longer), and both weight about 4.2 ounces.   The standard G2 has a tactical tailcap (press and hold for light, twist for constant on), while the G2X Pro had a click tailcap where you click once and the light will stay on, click again and it will switch to full brightness, click again for off. The non-detachable aluminum bezel with dual mode LED and the click tailcap are the primary differences between the G2 and the G2X Pro.  These differences are also what takes the G2X Pro into a completely new role.

In testing, I tried using the G2X Pro as a backup weapon light to search and clear rooms, but found the multi-click interface SureFire Flashlight G2Xpoor for this role.  With some practice I may have become proficient, but with all the better lighting solutions for that role, the G2X Pro doesn’t make sense as a weapon light backup.  I lent the light to several police officers and they came to the same conclusion.  They were impressed with the 200 lumens and the beamshape, but the multi-click interface was not acceptable.  If you are looking for a G2X series backup weapon light, you might find it in the G2X Tactical, which is 200 lumens only and does not have a multi-click switch.

Where the light really excelled was the in the general purpose and emergency light roles.  I carried the light in my EDC bag and used it for daily use tasks that I would normally use my SureFire L1 (Read Josh’s Review of the SureFire LX2).  It was also good in the outdoors, guiding the way home through a trail using both the low and high settings.  The click tail cap made no difference in these circumstances.  When a storm took out power and the lights at work, I ran the G2X Pro on low mode in my office so I didn’t have to work in pitch black.  After six hours the bezel was not even warm.  Running the light on high for about 45 minutes did get the bezel quite hot.

I also have to mention how extremely well this light uses batteries.  As long as you use Surefire approved batteries, you will getSureFire GX2 Pro at least the published run times.  Though the thorough testing I tried to put this light through I only changed batteries once.

The Surefire G2X Pro is an outstanding light that is perfect for the survivalist or prepared individual.  If you are comfortable carrying a light this size as an EDC light, it will serve you well.  Otherwise, I suggest you carry it in your EDC bag, bug out bag, or vehicle.   The rugged construction, excellent performance, and enhance capabilities make it a solid choice for almost any situation.

Read Mr. Smashy’s Classic Series “Survival Shotgun

All Photos by Mr. Smashy’s (click here for Smashy’s Flickr Page)



Mr. Smashy
Written by Mr. Smashy

Mr. Smashy has been shooting competitively for more than 15 years. Scouted from a junior club rifle team for the state team, he has won state championships in several events over his years. Mr. Smashy currently competes in NRA Highpower, USPSC, Action Pistol, among others. Mr. Smashy has excellent knowledge of US service rifles, reloading, and marksmanship. Read his full interview here. Read more of Mr. Smashy's articles.

31 thoughts on “Survival Gear Review: SureFire G2X Pro”

  1. How much longer does the low light mode extend the battery life? I have one of the Surefire Executive series, great light, but battery life is not great and I have an old mag light as backup since the light does not dim as battery life goes down.

    Reply
    • In low light mode (15 lumens) you get 45 hours of battery life. I'd say that as a daily use light with a mix of both modes every day, more use on the low mode side, batteries would last you over a month, probably more like a month a half or two.

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  2. Nice review. I had the G2, but battery life was horrid. I'll look into this new model with the extended life. Thanks.

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  3. Glad to see you back Mr. Smashy… It's been a while since I have seen any articles from you. Very consise and fair evaluation of the flashlight, as usual with your "gear reviews"! Couple questions if you don't mind- _#1. How tough is the body of this flashlight? I carry a mini-mag that was issued to my father when he was working with Special Forces in South America (supposedly has stronger construction for use as a weapon). It works extremely well as a "fist-pack", a small baton for hitting "pressure points" and for using as a smashing instrument, especially effective against the skull, jaw or sternum. _

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    • #1) The body of the flashlight is extremely tough, but there is a bond between the aluminum head and Nitrolon body that may be a weak spot. I would recommend using a light with a fully aluminum body like a 6PX Pro, the Executive series, or the LumaMax series of lights for use as a compliance tool. They have been known to work well as fist loads and for use on pressure points for compliance.

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  4. #2. What are the types of batteries that are approved by Surefire? What is the price difference between those particular batteries and an average one of comperable size (Duracell, energizer, Etc.)? Is there really all that much difference between the approved batteries and the standard ones? Is it the run-time, brightness, or both that suffer from using the standard batteries?
    #3. Does it use a propietary bulb/assembly (like the kinds with the parabolic-dish)? If so, do you know if there are any "generic" bulbs/assembly's If there are ones y how difficult are they to find and how expensive are they?

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    • #2) Please see this link: http://www.surefire.com/BatteryFAQs Using Surefire, genuine Panasonic®, Duracell® or Energizer® batteries will not void your warranty. The difference in quality between USA and Chinese is immense. The difference is runtime, brightness, and sometimes even safety. Lithium batteries are no joke, and can explode and set on fire easily.

      #3) The LED emitter is a permanently affixed unit that cannot be replaced by the end user. The beam shape and runtime are outstanding and I would not want to change the bulb assembly of this light.

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      • "Lithium batteries are no joke, and can explode and set on fire easily. " While the most power for weight commercially available, those Li-Ion batteries can and have caused fires more than once. In one case I personally know of, after over 2 years of testing, a Li-Ion spontaneously failed between cells within a few weeks of the design being released for use leading to excessive heating. I try to never use one where it can cause problems by overheating. If I have to use one I choose from your recommended suppliers. Good call, sir.

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  5. Awesome article Mr smashy, it sounds like you really put it to the test and covered all the bases. However, this is going to be my first negative comment posted on this site since I became a subscriber. I have nothing against you Mr smashy or your writing, in fact I like your writing style, nor do I have a problem with surefire. I am sure they are fantastic lights ( even though I have never owned one) My problem with a lot of the gear that is out there ( not just on this site but everywhere) is the price. I'm glad you tested it because there is no way I would ever buy one because I am not going to drop 80 bucks on a flashlight or 350 bucks on a perry knife. ( Do I want one? sure! but the price will never allow me to obtain them)

    Reply
    • Thank you for your comment and thank you for posting. I understand your problem, and it's a problem that many people have with Surefire. I do however have a need that Surefire fulfills, which is gear that I can be 99% reliant on, which is why I am willing to pay a premium price for their lights. All my rifles, shotguns, pistols that can have a weaponlight do, and it's a Surefire weaponlight. I own about a dozen handheld lights and carry one every day. To me it's worth the money because when I need the light, I can with almost absolute certainty know that it will be there. And for that 1% when it's not, I carry a spare light, and that's also a Surefire. Surefire make a solid product, an overbuilt product, and an expensive product, but you get what you pay for.

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      • You are completly right i'm sure, like I said i have never owned one. Plus I do apologize for using your article as a forum to vent from, have nothing against anything about the post but finally just felt like saying something about gear and their prices. I'm sure there are plenty of subscribers to survivalcache that can afford the gear reviewed by you guys ( just not me) and I do thank you for all the reviews you have cause it is nice to hear everything about a product from someone who actually uses it and not some ad. Keep up the good work.

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  6. Even if I could afford them I have a hard time thinking I would spend that amount on certain products. For instance, my light is a Rayovac RoughNeck, 200 lumens and runs on three AAA with about the same run time as the surefire you tested. I got it for less than 30 bucks and use it a ton. So the 50 bucks I saved could be used towards other supplies like food or first aid. I just want the common prepper to not get caught up ( like I sometimes do) in "cool" gear and make sure the priorites are there. Do your research on products before you buy, and if you have the extra cash for the more expensive items than go for it. Once again, Mr smashy great article and review but for me personally I don't see the feasability of spending that much on a flashlight.

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    • I understand completely on prices and the need for reliabilty. When I was actively engaged in the military, I spent a small fortune on gear because I had to trust what I had and not depend on the senator's or general's nephew/son/friend making a product that actually performed as needed. The plus side was I was able to keep my gear and use it as a tax write off, but the down side was the costs. For me at that time, the pros outweighed the cons. I have been using Streamlight flashlights and they seem to hold up to the tortures I place on them.

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      • whenever I think of gear and prices I am always reminded of the scene in the movie "the great outdoors" with john candy and dan akrod….they both have lighters when the power goes out….Roman pulls out some 200 dollar zippo looking lighter and it doesn't work…Chet pulls out a 79 cent bic lighter and it works and he chuckles.

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  7. Fenix LD20. Over 200 lumens, aluminum body, strobe and SOS signal modes, and it was only $55. Hell, mine even came with an attachment to make it a lantern. Check it.

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  8. It is indeed a fine line we walk. For years I had substandard gear because that was all I could afford or because I was too naive to know the difference. I still can't afford all the top rank gear I'd like so I have to search for the best within my price range. Sometimes the best is not the most expensive. It is annoying to have a really pricey item that I never use because what I got at the local feed store is so much better. On the other hand, there are some things I just won't try. If I have any choice at all, I will never trust a knife made in China. I've never had one that was reliable. I've had good luck with Mag-Lite stuff. Not the least expensive but not the most expensive either.

    I agree with Mr. Smashy about the two stage switch. Not what I want for a tactical light but it seems like it would be great for around the house/camp site.

    One item I couldn't find was an explosive atmosphere certification. It is weather proof so it should be OK but I'd like to see it stated plainly.

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  9. Nice article about flashlights but in a survival situationbut I'm thinking it's the batteries that will be in short supply. I have read a bit about the "shakeable flashlights" but I can never find a really good review on one of these shakeables…Can you do a review of "shakeable flashlights" and share it with the readers? It seems to me that eliminating the need for batteries would make the shakeables a much better item to own in case of a catastrophe. I want to buy a few but, like I said, I'm not sure which "shakeable flashlight" would prove to the the best…

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  10. Does anybody out there know of a flahslight with a runtime of minimum 10 hours? It doesnt have to be too bright i would just like it to have a really long runtime, and also it HAS TO run on eiter AA or AAA batteries, thanks.

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  11. Luke, runtime and brightness are in opposition but you can get a decent tradeoff with a regulated flashlight that runs on disposable batteries. You don’t want to drain a rechargeable to too low a voltage or you will damage it. With a disposable, you can use the regulator to boost the voltage to enough to power the light and get better runtime.

    Check out the Pacific from Peak LED Solutions. One Lithium AA battery and their medium brightness version should give you about 12 hours runtime. I have a stainless steel head on an aluminum body.

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  12. Surefire's website states 320 lumen max output, I sure thought it was a lot brighter than my 200 6Z.

    Output / Runtime — White Light
    High320.0lumens / 2.75 hours*
    Low15.0lumens / 45.0 hours*
    Tactical Runtime**2.5hours

    Reply

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