Aimpoint vs EOTech: Which is Better in 2020?

The choice between an EOTech holographic weapons sight and an Aimpoint red dot sight is a win-win decision. Both sights offer amazing optical performance, near indestructibility, and a proven track record in battle.

by Doc Montana, a contributing author of SurvivalCache.com

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EOTech vs Aimpoint Review

The downside of both of these sights are that they are fairly expensive, useless without batteries, offer no optical magnification, and are a popular target of counterfeiters.

EOTech, or Electro-Optics Technology is one tiny corner of the massive L-3 Communications Corporation based in the United States.  While L-3 might sound innocuous, it is, in their own words, “A prime contractor in aerospace systems and national security solutions.  L-3 is also a leading provider of a broad range of communication and electronic systems and products used on military and commercial platforms.”

Sale
EOTECH 512 Holographic Sight
  • EOTECH 512.A65 - Holographic Sight in Black with 68 MOA ring & 1 MOA dot reticle
  • Mount - Compatible with both 1" Weaver and MIL-STD 1913 Rails
  • Adjustable Brightness - The 512 has 20 brightness settings for use in any lighting scenario
Aimpoint PRO Red Dot Reflex Sight with QRP2 Mount and Spacer - 2 MOA -...
  • Designed to deliver premium performance under harsh conditions
  • 2 MOA dot with 4 Night and 6 Daylight brightness settings
  • Up to 3 years of continuous operation using one DL1/3N battery (included)

Last update on 2020-03-31 at 02:46 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

EOTech vs Aimpoint Review

Aimpoint, on the other hand, is a Swedish company that started in 1974 with the goal to improve shooting accuracy.  Aimpoint's challenge was, “to create a sighting technology that would allow shooters to acquire their target quickly, and to hit moving targets in all weather and lighting conditions consistently and accurately.”

On the surface of this EOTech or Aimpoint decision, it is easy to latch onto one specific feature or specification and use it to defend a preference. EOTech usually wins on price. Aimpoint always wins on battery life.  EOTech wins on reticle options. Aimpoint wins on being waterproof. EOTech wins on use with both eyes open.  Aimpoint wins for staying on until the battery dies or it is shut off.  EOTech wins for clearest glass.  Aimpoint wins for simplest red dot.  EOTech wins for smallest dot which is better for long range shooting. Aimpoint wins again on battery life (worth mentioning twice. It’s that good!).  And EOTech wins for being the optic that the Seal Team Six member used on the SBR that killed Osama Bin Laden.

As the owner of both an EOTech XPS and Aimpoint, I can see strengths and weaknesses with each one. While it is almost impossible to beat the five-year battery life of the Aimpoint, it is also easy to argue that if in CQB or running-and-gunning, the EOTech provides the fastest target acquisition and least obstructed field of view which is the main purpose of the sight in the first place.

The Aimpoint uses a reflected LED (light emitting diode).  The EOTech uses a laser to project a seemingly three-dimensional image on holographic film bonded to the inside of the glass window.  The optical physics keep both sights parallax-free, but the extra juice needed to power a laser beam compared to the electron-sipping LED light is to blame for the extreme difference in battery life between the two sights.

Last update on 2020-03-31 at 02:46 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Specs

The specs of the Aimpoint include:

  • Weight: 7.8 ounces or 220 grams
  • Submersible to 135 feet or 45 meters
  • Battery life ~50,000 hours
  • Battery: Lithium type 2L76 or DL1/3N
  • Smallest center dot size: 2MOA
Aimpoint PRO Red Dot Reflex Sight with QRP2 Mount and Spacer - 2 MOA -...
  • Designed to deliver premium performance under harsh conditions
  • 2 MOA dot with 4 Night and 6 Daylight brightness settings
  • Up to 3 years of continuous operation using one DL1/3N battery (included)

Last update on 2020-03-31 at 02:46 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

The specs of the EOTech include:

  • Weight: 8 ounces or 227 grams
  • Submersible to 10 feet or 3 meters
  • Battery life ~600 hours
  • Battery: Lithium type 123
  • Smallest center dot size: 1MOA
Sale
EOTECH 512 Holographic Sight
  • EOTECH 512.A65 - Holographic Sight in Black with 68 MOA ring & 1 MOA dot reticle
  • Mount - Compatible with both 1" Weaver and MIL-STD 1913 Rails
  • Adjustable Brightness - The 512 has 20 brightness settings for use in any lighting scenario

Last update on 2020-03-31 at 02:46 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

On the surface, it appears that the Aimpoint either wins or ties in every category, with the battery type as the only debatable exception.  But of course, the statistics don’t tell the whole story, and in this case we will leave plenty of room for your opinions.

Related Article: The Best Survival Carbine

Both optics are hands-down winners, and each has strengths and weaknesses depending on the particular survival situation.  One sight might be quicker on target, while the other sight may be more likely to paint a target when pulled from the gun safe years later.

Look and feel

Personally, I find the EOTech much faster on target when bringing up the rifle.  I can very easily see and aim the EOTech reticle while the Aimpoint dot is subject to interaction with the background colors and brightness.  I can all but ignore the framing effect of the EOTech’s metal housing.  It’s thinness disappears when stalking the battlefield with both eyes wide open.  However, the user interface (the buttons and their actions) are not something I like. While not much memorization is required, some is if you want to maximize their functionality. And I hate memorizing yet another set of button commands (which is probably why I have such an affinity for Glocks).

The Aimpoint is dangerously simple.  Dangerous to the bad guy, that is.  With battery life in excess of five years of constant on, users often report never shutting off the sight and changing the battery on their birthday either every year or every odd year.  And if you’ve ever experienced a dead electronic sight, you will certainly understand why someone would spend a small fortune on high-quality backup iron sights (even if they are made of polymer).

The EOTech is a good worker putting in an honest eight-hour day of holographic projection before shutting down on its own.  On the other hand, the Aimpoint is a true soldier that will keep illuminating the bullet’s point of impact non-stop until victory or battery death.  Although the probability of a sight going dark just when your life depends on it is extremely unlikely, it does roll around in the back of my head as something unacceptable.  But like most massive survival situations, restarting the EOTech is probably the least of my problems.

The Aimpoint feels much bigger on the gun to me. It has a thick black ring surrounding the transparent optics that when tied with the eye-level battery compartment blocks a significant amount of important visual real estate that could have been used to locate bad guys.

Operation

The Aimpoint’s user interface is as simple as twisting a knob clockwise to make the dot brighter, and twisting it the other way to make the dot dimmer or turn it off.  The strange batteries that the CompM3 eats are found nowhere else in my tactical ecosystem, while the EOTech’s 123 batteries are also stuffed into all my Surefire flashlights and weapons lights.  The only other one-off batteries in my kit live in my Leica rangefinder and my garage door opener remote control.

Ok. Now you know where I stand so tell us what you think.  What side are you on in the EOTech vs. Aimpoint debate?  Yes, I know all about the Trijicons on the higher end, and all the other red dot and reflex sights on the lower end, but let’s keep this debate between EOTech and Aimpoint. Otherwise the cagefight between optics might throw a high-priced, Trijicon ACOG TA31-ECOS-RMR battlesight, into the ring against a no-name Chinese-made “Holographic Tactical 1x30mm Red-Green-Blue dot sight hunting rifle scope.”  And what’s the fun in that?

So where do you stand on this issue?  Join the debate below. Make sure to check out more details on the products below:

Sale
EOTECH 512 Holographic Sight
  • EOTECH 512.A65 - Holographic Sight in Black with 68 MOA ring & 1 MOA dot reticle
  • Mount - Compatible with both 1" Weaver and MIL-STD 1913 Rails
  • Adjustable Brightness - The 512 has 20 brightness settings for use in any lighting scenario
Aimpoint PRO Red Dot Reflex Sight with QRP2 Mount and Spacer - 2 MOA -...
  • Designed to deliver premium performance under harsh conditions
  • 2 MOA dot with 4 Night and 6 Daylight brightness settings
  • Up to 3 years of continuous operation using one DL1/3N battery (included)

Last update on 2020-03-31 at 02:46 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Photos by: Doc Montana

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42 thoughts on “Aimpoint vs EOTech: Which is Better in 2020?”

  1. Neither – and I have an Aimpoint. Reason is that for a "survival rifle" the best would be a scope without any batteries and 3x magnification. Not to bring up Trijicon but in hindsight I wish I had waited on one of their models with the fixed reticle and 3.5x magnification. The magnification helps with a multi purpose survival rifle.

    Reply
    • I am unaware of any actual testing, and have wondered the same thing about not only the electronic sights, but also flashlights with circuits and programable interfaces, and all night vision equipment.

      My feeling is that both sights, if fully exposed, would be toast. However, the Aimpoint is better shielded with each of its three components essentially lightly contained within is personal Faraday cage of aluminum housing. However, the LED is highly sensitive to voltage and could fry easier than the more robust laser LED.

      EOTech recommends that the battery be removed when stored for several reasons including a reduction of potential EMP damage.

      There may be more to the equation given that some postulate that the rifle could act like an antenna capturing more pulse energy then if the sight was sitting alone on the ground.

      My metal gun safe is also a Faraday cage. However, like in most SHTF situations, it will be the things we haven't considered that will get us like the Survival Cache website being down.

      BUIS and traditional scopes are required options for any serious planning.

      Reply
  2. Both sights have positive features. As a police firearms instructor, my experience has been that EoTechs tend to fail with significantly greater frequency than Aimpoints. Of course, that is just my experience, others may have other results.

    Reply
  3. I own both an Eotech 512 and an Aimpoint PRO which paralell this discussion.
    Have put 18,000 rounds of combined ammo thru both in the last 2 yrs.

    While the siren song of the huge battery life of the Aimpoint pulls strong, fact of the matter is the Eotech performs better as a SIGHT due to the reticle, the size of the dot, and the shape of the housing.
    And this is the reason why we run these kind of sights in the first place right?

    I mean if all we want is eternal batterry life might as well stick with irons… But target aquistions speed is the original raison d'etre of such sights, which is why it must be weighed most heavily.

    Reply
  4. As David from Alabama said, after watching my coworkers replace their batteries and have to re-zero their EOTechs (in some cases literally every time we qualified), I opted to pick up an Aimpoint Patrol Rifle Optic (PRO). The Aimpoint PRO is around $400, reliable, durable, waterproof and shock proof. Mine spends its days riding around in a soft rifle case in my trunk and has held a zero after numerous vehicle pursuits, numerous tactical team trainings, getting smashed against other gear, etc. Mine is on in my trunk right now and has been on since June of last year. Without trying hard, I hold an inch group at 100 yards even with the 2 MOA dot.

    If the size is an issue, Aimpoint offers a number of smaller options that have significantly smaller barrels, profiles and weight, although they are slightly more expensive than EOTechs.

    Reply
  5. Anyone know which would be better for a left handed shooter. To me it seems like the eotech seem to block less of my field of view. Also was wondering which company backs a better warranty, if I remember correctly from my last research it was aimpoint.

    Reply
  6. Why not the Meprolight 21?? it doesn't have the need for batteries at all. I figure in a REAL SHTF scenario, I'd to worry less about batteries and the ability to aim at my target. Just sayin"

    Reply
  7. There is a lot of confusion among the public and even some CWMD professionals on this subject

    Since the circuits are small an Aimpoint or EOtech will not be affected by the E2 and E3 waves of EMP but by E1 only.
    If the device is switched off when E1 occurs there is little risk.

    Reply
  8. I just bought an Aimpoint Comp ML3, and I'm positively in love. It has a LaRue QD mount with a swing-lever which I personally prefer to knurled/slotted knobs. If it stops working when I need sights, I don't want to have to sight through the back sight, through the optic, to the front sight…I get the non-working components the hell out of the way for a better field of view.

    That being said, to stay on point, I've used an EoTech, I've used an AimPoint. As stated in the article, the EoTech is a bit more compact and kinda gives more of an impression of sturdiness hunkered down on the upper receiver like a concrete bunker…but really, when you boil it down, it's an apples to apples debate. Both are top-of-the-line dot optics that you can't go wrong with. If you want a bit faster reticle pickup and are willing to trade that for battery life and battery availability, go EoTech. But if you want something that will have insane battery life and be almost as quick, go AimPoint. It's not like you can go wrong either way.

    Reply
  9. Let me share my experience with CCOs in regards to Aimpoint and EOTech.

    EOTechs have to realistically be looked at as a system with a limited operating life. I've heard more experienced shooters describe them as "disposable". EOTechs have improved over the years, but people I know that run EOTechs run the 516/517 or the 556 if they require NV. The side mounted buttons and built in rise mean you can get a lower third cowitness without a LaRue riser or other rails. I don't know anyone that runs the transverse battery models and I have personally seen two XPS units die during training due to how recoil affected the battery. This is the main downfall of the EOTech; recoil eventually will disrupt it's operation. You may have a very old EOTech in perfectly good working order; there is nothing deficient with you or your optic, but high volume shooters who depend on their carbine will eventually, on a long enough time line, see a failure. But the advantages of the EOTech are many, so it's worth the possibility this failure to run one. The standard layout I see EOTechs setup with is an M4/carbine upper with a fixed FSB, a 516/517/556 forward on the upper receiver, and a fixed rear sigh, typically an LMT A2 rear sight. This allows you slightly adjust your head and have an iron sight picture instantly while running an EOTech. Also, the irons may have a standard 300m BZO and the EOTech is zerod for 200 yards; I might not do this personally, but a Marine spent lunch break during training explaining why he did this and some of it was compelling.
    EOTech PROs: Value, very fast reticle, 1 MOA dot can be precise, reticle has built in hold overs for height over bore, battery life is good with lithium AAs or CR123s, side buttons easy to access, lightweight, no mount to buy
    EOTech CONs: Bulky feel, large optic windows collect dust can be difficult to clean, sensitive to recoil, TCO high

    Aimpoint has been making high quality CCO for a long time, and as a example of their quality, a close associate's department received an allotment of 120 early generation DRMO M68 CCO (CompM2s circa 2003-4is) They were sandy, scratched, but they all lit brightly and had they chose too, could have been mounted on the patrol carbines. I snagged a complete set, including a carry handle mount, for my "Blackhawk Down" carbine build I have planned for a rainy day.
    The Comp M3, T1, and RCO are all very serviceable, rugged optics. They all have outstanding battery life (3 years for the RCO on setting 7). The advantage over the EOTech is they are extruded aluminum tubes with coated glass optics and decades of experience in the CCO/RDO industry. The detriments over EOTech are cost, the requirement for a mount, weight (excluding the T1), and the reticle (simple 2/4 MOA dot). The simple Aimpoint dot reticle may be slower than an EOTech, but Comp RDS have been used for decades in competition to speed up sight acquisition, so it's something an individual needs to test.

    A final point, the EOTech warranty is 2 years. The Aimpoint warranty is 2 years for professional or competition use, 10 years for personal use.

    Reply
  10. I worked for a departments who's used Trijicon TA47 with an amber triangle fixed to a (removable) carry handle. While these were 2x, not 3x, new officers who had never handled a rifle before (Chicagoland metro department) could print decently well and pass the patrol carbine state qual after 3 hours of hands on training. I and several contemporaries disliked the setup, but they were purchased with Federal Asset seizure funds so they were a rush job. Bushmasters with a 1:9 barrel, TA47 ACOGs affixed to a removable carry handle. A lot of work was put in to make these reliable rifles and every knob was witness marked because bored patrolmen would spin the windage knob 30 clicks while drinking coffee and reading messages on his toughbook or iphone.

    Anyhow, if a student could pick up on BAC, he could get faster, more accurate hits. I used a personal carbine with a carry handle and a NM front sight and wrecked everyone on the pop-up range except an officer with a AR-10 with an ACOG that was calibrated for .308 ball. He also had a bipod and I was shooting standing in a pit.

    My experience with 4x ACOGs on 20" rifles has been excellent.

    Reply
    • Good to see you back. Thanks for the advice and personal experience input.

      Have you used the ACOG without the tritium illumination? I want my AR to be a little less dependent not only on batteries but also with tritium it is said to lose its glow over a period of time (10 years of so). Thoughts????

      Reply
      • I'm not aware of any ACOGs that don't have some sort of tritium element, but most are bosted by a fiber optic light pipe, sometimes too much so. I've see and sometimes applied a bit of 90 MPH tape over the tube to limit the amount of ambient light to prevent the reticle from washing out or being overly bright on a bright background and remain sharp.

        On the other hand I have a TA01NSN that is tritium lit only and it is 12+ years old and the illumination is only visible with the naked eye after dark. It was meant for use with NVD so the output of the tritium was reduced to work with amplification tubes. For day use I don't even treat it as a light reticle and just a fancy rugged 4x scope with stadia markings that don't quite work for my rifle (TA01NSN is calibrated for a 14.5 using M855, I have mine zeroed on a 20" with M193, but I have a feel for the BDC.)

        Reply
  11. The thing about the EOTech and Aimpoints, When the U.S. Military buys them everyone else wants it. I have used and owned both, During active duty my EOTech failed. Being active I just DXed the Crappy EOTech for another one. My Aimpoint has never failed, both issued and personally bought. Going in harms way with a sight that may fail is not an option. I have two crappy EOTechs that don't work free to who wants them. EOTech does not fix them, they just say buy a new one. Spend a little more money to start and get something that works buy an Aimpoint. My aimpoint from 1993 still works today, my latest EOTech from 4 years ago stopped working for no reason except I shoot as much as possible. Lat thing Buy two Aimpoints, have one on your working riffle, keep the other in its box with out a battery, when the EMP comes, just swap them out. you'll be good to go for 3-5 years depending on how many batteries you have stored.

    Reply
  12. I bought an EOtech XPS-0 originally for my patrol rifle and at the time wore glasses/contacts (contacts usually) and had astigmatism. The EOtech, unknown to me at the time, is known for being difficult to use for people with astigmatism and I had tons of problems with it. Even after getting LASIK I found the EOtech reticle to be very distracting, the ring with the crosshairs pointing out the sides made it hard for ME to pick up the tiny dot in the middle.

    I've since switched to an Aimpoint PRO (Patrol Rifle Optic) and absolutely love it. The PRO only ran me $400+tax, compared to about $550 for the XPS. I am also considering an Aimpoint Micro T-1 for my personal Stag AR. The very simple red dot of the Aimpoint is so easy and faster for me to acquire and get rounds on target fast.

    One other option in the same price range is the Leupold Prismatic. I know quite a few people who have these and absolutely love them. Best part about these is the reticle is etched so it's visible with or without the illumination module. No batteries required. I'm sure there are down sides to it just as with the Aimpoint or EOtech's, but at a price of $400-$600 for these things I'd hardly call any of them "throw away" optics.

    Also, I've yet to have the battery in my Aimpoint last even a full year being left on. Just because the manufacture says its so doesn't mean it is. Try them all out before you drop the coin on one of these bad boys to see which one you "absolutely love." That's the best advice I can give.

    Reply
  13. Hmmmmn! I have a significantly different take, NEITHER. I used the CCO Aimpoint on AD and it was okay. What comes to mind is function rather than pros and cons. What is the function of these types of optics as opposed to a scope The answer is CQB, however, that doesn't explain the billions of hours on the range spent "point shooting" from "here" to 25 yds. Unless you're doing a "hot" snatch and grab/ambush at 0400 and using NOGS, I would rather have open sights and a mounted laser and/or flashlight to do room clearing, day or night (although a tritium post/ghost ring would have been nice). Even if using NVDs, you're still point shooting. Never encountered any "domestic" rooms so big that I needed to aim. Most distances for that kind of CQB, even in most courtyards was 15 yds or less. If you can't hit something at that range, INSTINCTIVELY, it won't matter what optics you have!!! In a SHTF situation, you prolly shouldn't be house clearing in most cases, IMHO. Walk around your house with your AR, WHAT IS THE LONGEST SHOT YOU COULD TAKE? Other than the rich and famous, most of those shots will be a max of 3-5 yds. My house is an exception, but only by design, and I could conceivably have a 22 yd shot (very unusual) from wall to wall. For the money spent on these sights, I would rather have a quality, 30 mm, 1×4 scope with co-witnessed BUIS, and one of the small holos mounted on my strong-side 45 deg. mounts. CQB is just that, and if you want a holo, you can have one, on cant and inline with the bore for close in work (if you must). A 1moa dot is nice, reticles are even nicer. Most optics are parallax free past 50 yds or so. A 1×4 scope will allow accurate shooting easily out to 300-400 yds for a properly sighted weapon and requires no batteries. And with my preferred weapon, an AR-15A3/4 (depends on whose definition) RIFLE w/ 20" barrel, 600 yds is doable. I don't see the need for the CQB optics on a SHTF weapon. K.I.S.S. Two scopes on QD mounts (spare/backup) need no batteries and are EMP proof. You could get two quality scopes and two QD mounts for the price of one optic (you have to have BUIS anyway). The other stuff is just "nice to have" crap. IMHO. Be Well.

    Reply
  14. I have only seen one without the illumination. It was a Trijicon and at a very reputable local sporting goods store. It was only 700 bucks and they were pushing me hard on the 1,500 dollar model. after i researched the life of illuminationI wish I had snagged that one.

    Reply
  15. Matt, thats interesitng.. I ahd the exact opposite expereince. I have slithg agstigmatism in my shooting eye ( tho still see 20/15 w/ it!) .
    I noticed when trying to zero my Aimpoint PRO the dot would form into a spindle, this became obvious during zero where you try to be precise.. the EOtech dot stayed a dot.

    Reply
  16. Excellent debrief. I have found the best option was the EOTech. The reticle and housing size puts it on top for me. Both are great options though so I can see how different shooters can pick either one.

    Reply
  17. I'll make yet another comment based on addtional experience in last few months.

    Again the AIMpoint PRO is a great product but the crtiticism to the EOTech's supposed lack of ruggedness seems misplaced.

    I ran my EOtech at 19 F when the seals in any optic are at their smallest and it fell into the snow several times when bounding over roots and rocks and even then never got any fogging.

    This included overnight stays and over night trianing in snow, sleet (different weekend) and later rain (different weekend).
    Rifle just lay in the mud etc.
    Ocular is hard glass and when I cleaned it i usually just used my sleeve with no ill effect.

    Reply
    • Been on the same set of Energizer Ultra Lithium AA for 18 months now and running 10 hr/day SUT weekends almosty twice a month.
      Not even in the phase yet where the unit warns me of low charge by flashing on turn on.

      Never had it turn off on me randomly as the day progressess I change the brightness of course with changing light conditons so the 8 hr shut-off ( for btry protection) resets then every single time.

      I want to like the Aimpoint PRO, because it looks better and has the (essentially) eternal battery life but I am more confident in my shooting performance w/ the EOtech and have had plenty of time to compare both.

      Reply
  18. Ohhhh and hey did I mention about the Trijicon battery life??? What else can I say about the fucking Trijicon red dot that never dies…….hmmmmm……hey did I mention about the Trijicon battery life? Is is not the best fucking red dot sight this side of Pluto?…..hmmmmmm……Hey man did I mention about the Trijicon battery life???
    I think the score is like Eotech 10, Trijicon 1 in this utterly useless review of the two sights. I have an Eotech and have never even looked through a Trijicon, but if if I am laying mortally wounded for not having had all the advatages of an Eotech….I will be sure to mention to the enemy that just shot me……hey man did you know about the battery life of my Trijicon red dot….it's THAT good:)))

    Reply
  19. I had to agree with tripodxl to some extent. For the distances he was talking either sight may actaully be a hinderence. But for actual urban combat the distances are greater. A scope is nice but really slow to sight picture at that horribly dangerous distance of 20 to 50 meters. I have used both aimpoint and eotech for duty and military. I wanted a 1-4 scope in the military but liked the quicker eotech or aimpoint for police work. When we deployed carbines we were looking at engagement distances over 20 meters usually. In my opinion the eotech was a more accurate sight with the 1 Moa dot but I eventually settled on the aimpoint. Even with the 4 Moa dot I could easily keep all my shots inside 5 inches at 100 meters. But it was the battery life that swayed me to the aimpoint. I changed batteries every 12 months and left it on 24/7. For me the aimpoint was the right choice. That was confirmed when another officer did have his eotech turn off one night. It just died. He was able to turn it back on but it would shut off after about an hour from there on out. Not sure what was wrong and it was about 4 years old. He purchased another one and it worked flawlessly for the last 5 years, but my original aimpoint is still going strong. They both seem great and it is probably just a personal choice which one is best for you.

    Reply
  20. I have had two Eotech's (512 and XPS 2.0) both have had issues. I still own the XPS, it sits on a 15-22 now.

    The 512 had battery issues and reticle dimming (gas problems). Both times Eotech fixed it at no cost. I sold it after I got my XPS. My XPS shut off one time when shooting. I could not start it back up. I removed the battery and put it back in and it was good (same battery). Later that same day I replaced the battery. That issue has not happened again. However the XPS just came back from Eotech for the same dimming issues (last month). It is only two years old. I babied both of them to be honest.

    Eotech's have great reticle's that just grab the eye, they are super fast for CQB, and the 1 MOA dot is great for distance. I can shoot soda cans at 200 yards (supported).

    That all said, I simply can't trust them 100%. I think they are popular in the Military with the SF guys for all the reasons I stated above. The huge difference between the military and me…..supply depot. Every SF guy that has issues with a Eotech goes to his supply clerk and gets a new one. I can't do that.

    My advice to anyone looking at a Eotech, even the EXPS/XPS versions vs a Aimpoint Pro (or better model) get the Aimpoint.

    Reply
  21. I personally have a Aimpoint PRO and really like it. Two video's to check out on YouTube to show the durability of an Aimpoint and the ability to use one at extreme ranges were done by Larry Vickers on his channel. In one the Daniel Defense durability test you cant believe the abuse the sight takes including being blown up and yet it still works and holds decent zero. In the other Larry with a spotter gets hits on steel at 400, 500 and 600 yards using only the Aimpoint.

    Reply
  22. If it needs a battery I do not consider it there are Tritium powered with no moving parts ACOG, Trigicon Meprolite
    amd a few others.

    should there be a problem with long term disaster, electrical or supply I would consider not using a sight with batteries.
    good scopes with quality ground lenses in a scope can see in very low light as well.
    one other thing if it requires batteries I would rather it used AAA but more so AA's If there were any one engineering development I could change is the advent of the CR123 and so many different coin batteries

    I want to say that if we are prepping for an unknown event anything battery powered or electrical ia not to be
    counted on especially in or on mission critical gear when there may be no hope of resupply or areas may be
    black due to overcast or some man made intervention fire light will liven up trintium but if we cannot aquire batteries or for some unknown reason they fail to function then all you have is dead weight.

    I am not against them but I would rather have NV and have to ditch it than a weapons site.

    I have owed all of these at one time or another but now I have changed my thinking on counting on batteries
    I have items that need them and I will sorely miss all my gadgets but their combined weight is minimal
    I have a 8X magnifing mirror behind a tea light candle in a glass candle lantern it will be better than a flashlight that does not work and a scope without batteries works with a sliver of a moon.

    I am perplexed so many people are counting on powered items like cell phones GPS and watches when there is a posibility that these will not function and cannnot be recharged under a few scenarios.
    some weaponry is overly complicated for a long term or under constant filthy conditions they may be required to operate in for months or years on end.

    many people have stated it and post like it never happened well here it is again, " prepare for the worst"
    so items need to have a low failure rate the fewest moving parts and no I repeat NO batteries.
    If it fails in more than one of these catagories I would have a backup that was it's opposite.
    only an opinion consider it.

    Reply
  23. Great insights on both Aimpoint & EOTech! I do have Aimpoint PRO & EOTech XPS 2.0 and I'm strongly agree with what you were saying. Both have their own pros and cons and all that matter is the personal preference

    Reply
  24. In my experience the Eotech is MUCH more likely to fail that any other serious optic. The Aimpoint has the advantage of (1) being absurdly reliable, (2) not having to fidget with controls to actually turn it on, and(3) having to worry about batteries all the time.

    Aimpoint is the sensible choice for a combat or survival rifle. Eos can be made to work, but are not worth the extra hassle in my experience.

    Reply
  25. Aimpoint and EOtech are both excellent optics! I had a really tough time choosing them. But I love Aimpoint PRO more than EOTech since it suits my shooting style and personal preferences. Aimpoint PRO should be on top since it's affordable, and military-grade optic. It must be in your optic's consideration lists.

    Reply
  26. Eo's for me. I have the older AA battery styles because of the ubiquity of AA batteries.

    GG&G in AZ makes a great optics cover for ALL Eotech models and the spring loaded QD for standard models solves the problem of loosening under recoil and mounting across the delta-ring.

    Field of view is MUCH better than Aimpoint and THAT is an important consideration to avoid "Tunnel Vision" during CQ engagements and in fast target acquisition..

    I have tested mine extensively. They are reliable and durable.

    BTW, L3 has a fix for in-line battery models like mine for the recoil-off problem. It is free and It seems to work well.

    Reply
  27. Have used the Aimpoint Comp ML2 and both Eotech M553 (Su231/PEQ) and Eotech M500 (Bushnell holosight II) for over 5 years. Use ML2 and M553 on rifles 7.62x51mm and Bushnell on M870 12 GA "Riot gun". Have had no problems with any of these (including shooting slugs from M870).. Battery life is certainly less on Eotechs. Several times the Aimpoint red dot reticle dimmed out under recoil (M1A)- probably a battery issue. By the way, the M553 is waterproof to 20 meters.

    Reply
  28. All I hear about in these threads are Aimpoints long battery life, 5 years constant on… I don't get this at all.

    Everything in a tactical situation revolves around training and motor reflex repetition, reacquiring the target fast and eliminating it. I have never been in a combat situation where I was in a fire fight for so long I was worried about running out of batteries, plus as with ammunition, I carry a spare battery. All goes back to training. I also take care of my equipment and I would never let the battery get so low that I was worried about it in the first place. The batteries are not expensive.

    To me the EOTech wins hands down in fast target acquisition in CQB and that is the most important aspect to me. I am not taking anything away from Aimpoint, it's a great product. I am just tired of hearing Aimpoint and long battery life. With EOTech you can still use your iron sites just fine even without batteries in, that's a big plus. I don't know if you can do this with the Aimpoint or not but I would say it would be much harder.

    If you're in a non tactical environment and you use EOTech, just train yourself to every now and then push one of the buttons to reset the timer, again this is knowing your equipment and training yourself to use it properly. I don't think pushing a button once every 4 or 5 hours is really a big deal, hell you can push it every hour if you want.

    I don't know how many of these experts have ever been in real CQB but I have and EOTech is my pick.

    Reply
  29. It seems funny to me that there is such a hype over the Aimpoint's battery life. The Eotec has such a fine reticle. And its so fast to bring to view. The transparency of the housing allows awareness.
    There really is no comparison for me. The Eotec is a good product. Exceptionally built, and I trust it. The reticle will flash when the battery gets toward the end of its service life. Even then, it has a 80 hour on time before dimming.

    Reply
  30. You can't get a reliable co-witness through an optical scope, even at 1x. That applies to prism scopes too. It seems logical, but when you co-witness through an Aimpoint or an EOtech you are seeing the actual front sight through the red dot with virtually no distortion. It's like looking through a window.

    When you look at the front sight through a scope, you are seeing an image of the front sight that is being manipulated by the lenses and/or prisms in the scope. The front sight may or may not be where it appears to be through the scope. The best solution I have seen is 45 degree offset iron sights as a backup. There is also the option to mount an RMR on your ACOG for close in shots, which the ACOG is mechanically designed for.

    Reply
  31. I'm just a nobody, but I love the idea of a glowing red reticle that is always on for my "bump in the night" gun. Turning on your EOTech before battle is fine for cops & soldiers in the field, but I'm not a highly trained commando. I just want something that works with minimal potential for error.

    Reply

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