The Easiest 100 Gallons of Emergency Water Storage

In the movie of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, right after the nuclear explosion (or whatever it was) Viggo Mortenson runs to the bath tub and fills it up. He knows that the public water system will be down soon and an extra bathtub full of water is incredibly important. That’s a great idea and something I plan on doing in any emergency situation with enough prior warning. The WaterBOB is a great way to do just that, but more sanitary.

WaterBOB Bathtub Emergency Water Storage Container, Drinking Water Storage,...
  • COLLECT DRINKING WATER IN YOUR BATHTUB: The waterBOB is a water containment system that holds up to...
  • PREPARE FOR EMERGENCIES: Never be without water in an emergency. During a hurricane or tropical...

Last update on 2020-07-06 at 10:38 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

The WaterBOB Review

Emergency Water StorageThe WaterBOB is simple enough. It is a heavy duty plastic water storage container that you place in your bathtub and fill up. The bathtub itself supports the bag. The bag has a tube that you place over the faucet for filling.

  • Holds up to 100 Gallons
  • FDA Food Grade 10 mil plastic bag
  • Siphon Pump for Dispensing.

Advantages

Some people might think this is a waste of money when you could just fill your bathtub up with water without the bladder. That’s a good point, and what I would do if I had to, but there are a couple of things you might want to consider about the WaterBOB

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1. Cleanliness – sure you clean your bathtub, but you still bathe your dirty self in it everyday. I’d rather have my drinking water in a food grade container.

2. Longevity – Hopefully this 100 of so gallons of water will be enough to last you for a few weeks at least (depending on the number of people). Water left standing in your bathtub for several weeks, possibly without having had a chance to clean the tub before hand, is going to get dirty and moldy pretty quick.

3. Every Drop – Even if your tub is cleaner than a surgeon’s table it still has a drain. Even if you have a heavy duty drain you are going to lose some, and that is unacceptable in a survival situation. The WaterBOB isn’t going to lose a drop.

4. The End – What happens when you get to the very end of the supply? I would rather have my last gallon or two in a plastic container I can pickup, move, or drain instead of a 1/2 inch of three week old water in the bottom of my bathtub.

5. Cheaper – You’re first reaction may be that the price is too much for a WaterBOB, but if you look at that price of 55 gallon barrels that are food grade, you will likely pay $50+ for those, plus buy lids, and still only get roughly half the storage capacity.

Video

It sounds like an infomercial, but you get to see the thing work better than pictures.

What Do You Think?

I really can’t think of an easier way to quickly gather and store 100 gallons of clean water in an emergency. Would you use this system or stick with more traditional methods?

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Joel Jefferson
Written by Joel Jefferson

Joel is one of the original founders of SurvivalCache.com. After college, he joined the USMC where he served as an (0302) Marine Infantry Officer. Joel is an avid outdoorsman and spends much of his free time in the mountains. Joelโ€™s hobby is researching survival gear & weapons as well as prepping. Read his full interview here. Read more of Joel's articles.

104 thoughts on “The Easiest 100 Gallons of Emergency Water Storage”

  1. Great call on the CTD website – I've had the waterbob on my Amazon wish list for a while now – $20 is hard to beat. Just ordered it from CTD.

    Reply
  2. Good post, I mentioned this product awhile back and it is far and wide the easiest way to quickly store water. The toilet bowl works sure but it seems a lot cleaner in the Water Bob.

    Reply
    • SurvivalSpot,

      Haha yea the toilet bowl is one I wouldn't be going for unless I was extremely desperate. I have heard though that the water in the toilet tank is relatively clean, but I would still be boiling it.

      Reply
      • Nothing wrong with toilet reservoir water (tank above the bowl) I won't drink from the toilet bowl either. However, if one uses any toilet reservoir additive like blue bowl cleaner or any other chemical that is hung or disperesed in the reservoir, forget that water. But, there is about 20 gallons of potable water in the water heater. Since there may not be any elctricity to heat it or water pressure to push it to a fauchet, and if you turn off the hot and cold lines so that the water doesn't siphon back out, in-its-self it's a stored emergency water container.

        Reply
  3. Received mine today and it's now in the linen closet next to one of the bathrooms.

    For those w/o a bathtub, you might consider, in an emergency situation, taking to large plastic storage containers, cutting the ends off one side of them, and duct taping them together to form something like a large tub. Then use the Water Bob in that.

    Reply
    • Suburban,

      That's a good idea. I've been looking for some type of system like that because my house doesn't have any real bathtubs.

      I thought of making a wood frame but your idea seems much easier.

      One thing I'll have to remember, have to put it exactly where I want it before filling, it will weigh about 800 pounds when full and won't be going anywhere

      Reply
  4. I keep thinking about what a great idea this is, except . . . how do you know when to fill it? By the time you know you need it full, it's probably too late! Any ideas?

    Reply
    • Usually with a hurricane you have plenty of notice – and this should not be your only method of water storage either. I have "water-blocks" for long-term (5 year) water storage, 8.5 oz USCG approved water boxes (just the right amount for individual servings of Mountain House meals), and 8 oz. bottled water for short-term (1-3 month storage). I'm going to get the Water-Bob to add to my water preparedness capabilities.

      Reply
  5. Amy,

    I guess that's really going to come down to your discretion.

    For example, I would fill it before any foreseeable local emergency like a tornado or hurricane. You can see that coming and well have plenty of time.

    If it is something more immediate and unexpected then honestly filling that thing might be my VERY FIRST move. Water is the number one thing you're going to need.

    I am think (and hope) there is a pretty good chance if something happens and you immediately begin filling you will get a good amount of water. Most people will still be sitting around in shock, or trying to run to the grocery for milk and bread.

    Reply
    • Cayenne_andy,

      Thanks for the heads up. I really never considered for a second that buying directly from the company would be cheaper because most gear sites are usually cheaper.

      Thanks for the share, I will have to update the article to reflect the best price.

      Were you simply shipping to the continental U.S.?

      Reply
  6. Definitely going to get one. I think I'll put together the material to support the sides so it could be placed under a downspout for water collection and come up with some kind of cover.

    Reply
  7. aj52,

    Just be sure you make the container strong enough to support the system. It's going to be extremely heavy when completely full.

    I like you collection idea. I might want to find some way to do at least an initial filter before putting it in from the downspout. Debris in the closed container will make bacteria quickly

    Reply
    • Thinking of something like a water bed frame with a bottom to prevent puncture. Would go to the downspout after using it as intended and it is empty. I am thinking a nylon mesh similar to a pot and pan scrubber to filter debris. After that, through my Berkey for contaminant removal.

      Reply
      • very cool,

        If you do the project be sure to send me some pictures I'd love to see how it turns out.

        I've got a Berkey Sport Bottle coming sometime this week. (My first test with a berkey product) and I'm pretty excited about that.

        Reply
        • Since last post I did the buy 4 get 1 free Water Bob deal at their website. 1 for tub and 2 for downspouts on back of house. 1 for parents and 1 for in-laws. Takes a little pressure off knowing they have safe water. Regarding the Berkey products. I went with the Berkey Light. They are currently running a deal where you get 2 Sport Bottles free. These are going in GHBs for my wife and myself. Will be using Camel Bak clones so the bottles add a bit of extra protection if water foraging is necessary. I was impressed that Berkey actually showed the lab results. Many products brag about independent lab tests but somehow forget to show the results. Let the buyer beware!

          Reply
          • aj,

            awesome I'm glad to hear you got the WaterBob's. Let me know how the frames for your downspout ones turn out, and how you decide to make them.

            I usually hear nothing but good things about Berkey, and also AquaRain. I'm doing a bunch of research on water filtration and purification options right now for a future project.

  8. Putting a small amount of bleach in your water filled containers will keep water "fresh' for a very only time and isn't enough to cause any adverse effects on the drinker (s).
    http://www.bae.ncsu.edu/programs/extension/public

    4 drops bleach per quart or liter container of water
    8 drops bleach per 2-quart, 2-liter, or ½ gallon container of water
    16 drops bleach, or 1/4 teaspoon, per gallon or 4-liter container of water

    When treating larger quantities of water, use the following table to convert drops to standard measuring units.

    8 drops = 1/8 teaspoon
    16 drops = 1/4 teaspoon
    32 drops = ½ teaspoon
    64 drops = 1 teaspoon
    192 drops = 1 Tablespoon
    384 drops = 1/8 cup which is equal to 2 Tablespoons

    DO NOT USE BLEACH IN METAL CONTAINERS

    Reply
    • I am finding varying and conflicting info on the length of shelf life of household bleach . I am not going to give the formula,considering the potential consequences, of using pool chlorine powder as a water treatment. It makes a very powerful concentrate that would be further diluted as needed. Anyone interested could Google this themselves.

      Reply
  9. Say a weather event that could compromise water service is predicted but there isnt an interruption,how do you plan on draining the Water BOB if its not in your tub? You have to slash it to drain it completely nor is there a way to remove all the water by siphoning which leads to creepy-crawlies. Those of you that are considering using this for water storage(other than emergency) or that dont have tubs might want to think about it. Also it isnt really built for long term or outdoor use IMHO. Im not even sure it could support its own weight without bursting if it wasnt in a tub or other very sturdy construction. I think youre definitely better of with drums for any long term storage or outside collection and the BOB for emergency use only.

    Reply
  10. Why not always keep it (partially) full in a bathtub/bathroom that gets little use anyway? Rotate the water every now and then by using 'older' water to water your survival garden.

    Reply
  11. There is no way to thoroughly flush out the BOB, its the nature of its design. Its quite likely that you would end up with mold or bacteria growth. You could use it for pre-treated water storage or collecting although it isnt really built for long term use. It was designed as a single use product. I think that it is a really useful method of emergency storage but wouldnt quite live up to rigorous or extended use. I recommend finding it for as a low a price as possible for this reason. For long term drinking water storage I would recommend food grade plastic 55 gallon barrels. For wash water or water for gardening any plastic drum/barrell will do. These are built for long term use and will last forever.

    Reply
  12. I'm waiting for mine to come in. As far as the pros/cons I've been reading… I think the water bob falls along the lines of the handgun. I'd rather have it and not need it, than to need it and not have it!

    Reply
  13. I'm going to stay away from the Water BOB personally. I don't know about where you live, but here I can get 24ct 1/2L (3.17 gallons) bottles of distilled water for $4.99. This means that for the same price I can get more than 25 gallons of water. I realize that it's 1/4 of the water, but I don't have to worry about getting home to turn water faucets on, I don't have to worry about whether the water is safe of not, and I don't need to worry about how to transport a giant IV bag around.

    Same thing with the 55 gal drum, for the same price I get the storage container, and the water, with no prep needed.

    Reply
  14. I'm going to stay away from the Water BOB personally. I don't know about where you live, but here I can get 24ct 1/2L (3.17 gallons) bottles of distilled water for $4.99. This means that for the same price I can get more than 25 gallons of water. I realize that it's 1/4 of the water, but I don't have to worry about getting home to turn water faucets on, I don't have to worry about whether the water is safe of not, and I don't need to worry about how to transport a giant IV bag around.

    Same thing with the 55 gal drum, for the same price I get the storage container, and the water, with no prep needed.

    Reply
    • But where are you storing that? Also during Katrina you couldn't buy water ANYWHERE for hundreds of miles. The shelves were cleaned out.

      Reply
      • I usually store mine across the bottom of my bedroom closet (fit about 12 packs of 16.9Oz bottles, 32-per-case, 6 wide 2 high). Given all my clothes are up on hangers, and shoes are in another closet, there is plenty of floor space under my hanging clothes to store the bottled water. They say each person needs 8×8 (64 ounces) to drink each day, so that's about 4 Aquafina bottles per person, per day. In addition to enough for each person, don't forget enough water for cleaning/making food for each person and any animals. So I estimate for 2 people, 2 dogs (my scenario) to take about 128 Oz a day, which is 8 bottles of water (so I have enough for 48 days stored).

        I use them regularly by putting one case worth in the fridge, when it runs out in a week or two, go to the store and by another case to "freshen my stores". Keep using the oldest first, and mark on them with a Sharpee when you bought it. That way, if a Katrina does happen, and no water can be found anywhere, you at least have 11 to 12 packs (in my case enough for about 6 weeks) to survive on (also have other things like those expensive hiking water filters to filter even the nastiest of water). Don't tell your neighbors, or your stores may become their stores.

        Reply
  15. I know this is kind of off subject, but another way to have fast drinkable water is simply take it out of your hot water heater. Most homes have between 30 and 55 gallon tanks, you would want to close off the valave at the top to keep new water from coming in if you believe the public water to be contaminated, but for all intensive purposes. A hot water heater has drinkable water in it, a lot of people overlook this water source. Also I would like to appologize if there is a pst somewhere else regarding this, I haven't had a chance to view all links as of yet.

    Reply
  16. I know this is kind of off subject, but another way to have fast drinkable water is simply take it out of your hot water heater. Most homes have between 30 and 55 gallon tanks, you would want to close off the valave at the top to keep new water from coming in if you believe the public water to be contaminated, but for all intensive purposes. A hot water heater has drinkable water in it, a lot of people overlook this water source. Also I would like to appologize if there is a pst somewhere else regarding this, I haven't had a chance to view all links as of yet.

    Reply
  17. The water BOB is a great idea. In north Arkansas we have been getting ice storms that shut off the power,sewage etc., for up to a week at a time depending on how rural you are.Your water heater, whether electric or gas is a clean supply of water ( 30-40 gallons) just remember to disconnect the power until it is full of water again as it wil burn out the elements.

    Reply
  18. Another commonly over looked water source is the tank on the back of your toilet…. and it uses gravity to "feed" the water to the bowl, so it does not come in direct contact with the contaminated parts.

    As far as using bleach… yatahey, Thank you for "breaking it down". According to the VA Dept. of Health (when I took my ServeSafe class) what you are looking for is around 200ppm concentration. To make this simple, you can buy simple test strips online that will tell you if its the right amount or not.

    As far as the Water BoB…. NOT for me, but I also have a very clean creek running behind my house and the supplies needed to make a cystern. I can see how it would be a good idea for some, but it's definately not a "multi-tasker", PERSONALLY I like things that can be used for multiple things.

    Reply
  19. One thing to keep in mind – the EPA did a study on emergency water storage in bathtubs not too long ago, and actually recommended against it (this was DIRECTLY storing water in the tub, NOT in the WaterBob).
    The EPA found that many tubs constructed earlier than the 80's had siginificant percentages of lead construction, and therefore made extended drinking water storage in them unsafe.

    Reply
  20. One thing to keep in mind – the EPA did a study on emergency water storage in bathtubs not too long ago, and actually recommended against it (this was DIRECTLY storing water in the tub, NOT in the WaterBob).
    The EPA found that many tubs constructed earlier than the 80's had siginificant percentages of lead construction, and therefore made extended drinking water storage in them unsafe.

    Reply
  21. 4 weeks! thats crap. i mean do you now exactly when a disaster might hit. it would be gross water by the time a disaster really hit. what if i want to take a shower or bath. nope theres my water bob. the water bob is absolutely a piece of crap!

    Reply
    • You're obviously a moron who doesn't read the whole page before commenting.
      The waterBOB is meant to be filled after you are notified (or believe) that an emergency situation is going to happen. You don't just buy it, plop it into your tub, and fill it up as soon as you've got it unwrapped.

      Reply
      • So what you're saying is I should spend $30 or so on this water bob when I have more than one gallon per person per day in my food storage.

        Reply
        • No, he's saying you should wind your neck in and stop being so confrontational. Pup.

          Or to put it another way:

          So what *you're* saying that that you would turn down an EXTRA 100 gallons of drinking water for the sake of $30?

          Reply
          • I have to say all things considerd for the price and the storage amount the water bob is pretty sweet. But I can also see that with that much water in your food storage you might not need the water bob.

    • I agree with the other replies on this but I would add one comment if I could. YOU CAN NEVER HAVE TO MUCH WATER!!!!! especially if your food stodage consists of freeze dried foods.

      Reply
  22. okay for those who can afford it. ..4 condoms unlubricate one inside the other held under the tap in a bathtub will fill with a few gallons of water . the biggest we were able to get held about 130 gallons
    of water and we used clothes pins carefully to close it and hold it . ..yeah it sounds yucky but it works . you have to be gentle with it. trojans to the rescue

    Reply
  23. The water heater in your home is a great source of water. Tap on the bottom. Just wait for it to cool and as long as the public drinkwater supply isn't contaminated you have many many gallons of fresh drinking water. And you can hook up a hose to the tap. Full of posibilities.

    Reply
  24. Long term water storage is a good idea in a bug in situation, but in a bug out situation you need a more portable source of water! AS we all agree that water is a #1 priorty I think we need to remember that in the real long term a water purification plan is a better idea than large amounts of stored water. The bleach system is ok, but purification tablets, water filters or purifiers are preferable to bleach! Also a supply of colodial silver is a good idea too, also I keep a supply of iodine on hand.

    I do recomend at least 25gls of stored water for imediate use and if you have to bug out you can carry it with you.

    Reply
    • I think you have a misconception about the capabilities of your water heater.
      A household water heater does not heat water to the boiling point, nor would you want it to. If it did, then you would have near-boiling water coming straight out of your hot water tap, which could be very dangerous.
      It would also be needlessly expensive and energy inefficient. Especially as it would have to boil the full contents of your water heater and keep all of it at that temperature 24 hours a day.

      Reply
  25. I think this is an excellent water sorce for bug in situations. The part of the move that was mentioned is something that the Australian goverment tells the people in the out back to do in the case of brush fires, which I'm taking it is common in that area. As for me, for 20 bucks, I'll buy two. One for my house and one for my BOB if the wieght isn't to much. In the back contry I can dig a hole, put in the bag, and then pack water from a far source. Run the, unknown, water through a gravity filter and into the Water BOB and you now have 100 gals. of water at your bug out site.

    Reply
  26. I bought two of these when they had them on sale (last year). I live in a 2 bedroom apartment, so we used one tub and set up the BOB in the other as a test. Took a while to fill, and the size/shape of our tub actually prevented us from filling the BOB all the way up to the 100 gallon limit, but it worked exactly as they show in the video. Ten days later, we had no funny taste or color changes in the water (even though we used the BOB multiple times a day for all our water needs). I am confident this item will work for me if I ever need to use it 'for real'.

    I bought another pair of them while the sale was still going on, and sent the one we had left over from the first purchase to a friend who also preps and lives in an apartment.

    Like any other piece of gear, you can choose to buy it or not, but for me, the option to store an additional 90/180 gallons of water in my apartment (on top of any bottled water, or water in my water heater) for twenty bucks was a no-brainer.

    Good idea. Good gear. Good price.

    Reply
  27. This looks like an amazing idea and I ma very interested. However I do have questions. Are they reusable? Do I need to worry about mold if I do reuse it? I live in tornado alley and have recently had more than a few scares and even a situation where this would have been a huge asset. I Just don't want to have to buy 20 of these. What would be my best option?

    Reply
  28. Water storage solved:

    Use water beds, they hold hundreds of gallons, which could be use to flush tollets or boil to drink.

    Keep new water beds and fill them when things look bad, after all you can sleep on them as well.

    Also, sleeping on a water bed on a hot night would be a PLUS!!!

    Reply
  29. Even if I don't use it for the end of the world, I live in FL where hurricanes are just a routine every summer. This is a great idea for those who decide to stay during lower category hurricanes. You never know when the water will be turned back on, and even then if it's clean. This is a great back-up to fill before the hurricane hits, that way if you run out of bottled water you still have this. I think I might buy this.

    Reply
  30. I think this is a good idea even to just add to existing water storage. I mean I would want to have a good storage of bottle or jugs of water somewhere but in the event something did happen and one were home it would be an awesome idea to throw this in the tub and fill it up for backup water as a last resort. This could be used for last resort drinking but could be used definitely for bathing and other purposes on top of what's already stored.

    Reply
  31. The 100 gallon capacity is misleading. The bag might sustain 100 gallons, but would be blown up like a balloon fit to bust. Plus, a regular bathtub like what they show getting filled up doesn't hold 100 gallons, only around 45-50. Don't get suckered by false claims. The bag can only reasonably hold 45-50 gallons and still be serviceable.

    Reply
    • you can get nearly 90 gallons of water in a typical bathtub if you fill it to the top — over the overflow drain that usually keeps you from filling it that full when you take a bath.

      Reply
  32. For those of us who can't think of buying a water bob, I guess it's just important to maintain drain cleaning for the sake of hygiene. I understand the others who think that this is useless, seriously, you'll just never know. Save the tub for cleaning yourself and get used soda gallons and put the water there.

    Reply
  33. I am on Social Security and that is just getting me by. I was in the survival business for 13 years so have a few items around the apartment from my work days. I collected some knives and such.
    Staying on topic re the water bag…..nice if you have the space and $40…..I keep any water bottles that people buy ( my wife and son) and clean them and dry them and keep them in a pantry closet. I also had a cat and kept several gallon jugs for cat litter. These have been washed out and hold a gallon of water each, have a large screw on cap and are sturdy for re use.. All told I have about 30 gallon storage capacity…I fill them up when ever we have a storm warning ( I did it for Sandy)….or the news is really bad ( Iran)….as well as filling up the shower stall in our apartment…its not 100 gallons as its only a stall 6" high. I also have 4 military canteens that I fill when there is a storm, trouble on the news, etc.. In our bug out scenario, I will have two canteens, my wife and son ea have one. We will try to carry out a gallon of water each, in our hands as our Bug out bag will have our essentials…if some one fights us for the water they can have it…as we have bottles and canteens in our packs. I will put as much food and water in the truck and see what happens….Living in NY I can't get a hand gun very easily but I have my twelve gauge Mossberg and an old Springfield 1903a3 30.06……

    Reply
  34. for you guys that store water…is it not a good idea to have this in addition? for me, i have 2 tubs, in that instance in a pinch you could have another 200 gallons in addition to what is stored. sounds pretty sweet to me.

    Reply
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    Reply
  36. You might also want to put up a sign not to use the tub. There's that odd chance that someone will just jump into the tub without looking, bursting that bag and wasting all that water in the process.

    Reply
  37. Not bad in a pinch, but wouldn't it have been better if the container could support itself? I mean, that way, you could have an emergency cache of water and still be able to take a bath.

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  38. I just have to ask how safe is that plastic container? It may be heavy duty, but if it leaks chemicals into the water, then it's just as bad as not having a water supply to begin with.

    Reply
  39. It seems nobody has listed a huge advantage of such a system.

    If you water is in a bag, it will not evaporate away!

    Reply
  40. Geez just buy a barrel. Why waste a perfectly good bathtub (where are you going to bathe during this crisis? Cleanliness is important too). Food grade barrels are $20 if you shop around. Fill it up with filtered water and forget about it.

    Or buy a waterbed!

    Reply
    • Not everyone has room for a barrel (think Apartment dwellers), and many places have restrictions on owner a waterbed (plus, not everyone likes sleeping in a waterbed)

      Reply
  41. in an emergency does the waterbob need the side support of a tub? i wouldn't mind having a couple on my flat hard tile floor for a while if i knew the water was going to be turned off … not long term

    Reply
  42. This type of water storage is good as part of emergency disaster preparation making sure that there will be no drinking water scarcity but I'm just curios about the lifespan of the water and the plastic, I'm afraid that there might be a black molds that will be form on the water since it will be place in a bathtub I've been planning to purchase one Perth plumbing services.

    Reply
  43. You can't beat a water bed… $50 from Walmart and holds 500 gallons of water. Note that this water will be best used for sanitation. More people died from disease and sanitation problems in places where shtf than other causes including starvation.

    Reply
  44. Also you can collect rainwater is a childs pool and you can do it in a stealth manner if you insert a funnel attached to a garden hose INSIDE a gutter downspout.

    Reply
  45. 275 poly food-grade containers are available on Craigslist all the time. I picked up two for $75 each. Hard to beat 550 gallons of bulk storage for $150.
    I don't plan on bugging out I have everything I need here. If it comes down to leaving, I would just be another starving refugee. That and the rabbit breeding setup can't travel.

    Reply
  46. I like this water bag bathtub idea. Not just for the sanitary considerations (because I have cleaning products in the bathroom and could clean my tub in 3 minutes before rinsing and filling it) but because of the drain leakage. Bathtub and sink drains were never meant to be 100% watertight with no leaks for days or weeks.

    As for how long tap water stays fresh, I've been experimenting with a white plastic food grade 55 gallon drum outside, filled by a clean bucket of fresh tap water from the garden hose, filled about 5-6 gallons at a time every few weeks as needed. The water is used for hand-washing, cleaning vegetables, and even drinking. I add a tablespoon or Clorox bleach to it every now and then, and so far (4 months later) the water still looks clear and tastes good. I probably have to use more bleach for this outdoor storage since the white plastic barrel is in the sunlight and lets in plenty of UV light that degrades the chlorine bleach. In your bathroom the water should be easier to sanitize and keep that way.

    Reply
  47. I keep 2 dropcloths in each bathroom that have tubs…lay a dropcloth in the tub fill with water..add bleach..lay drop cloth on top of water…waters clean….easy to dip or siphon from….cheap….

    Reply
  48. everyone has a ready source of water in an emergency….the hot water heater…there is 40-50 gallons of heated water that should be safe to use. hook hose to bottom with shut off valve on hose…a doctor i worked with in Emergency department told me this.

    Reply
  49. I keep every single plastic 'disposable' bottle filled with water in my unused cupboards, out buildings and garage. People thought me crazy until a water main went down in our (rural) area for 10 days! My staff and their families could collect water from me for free. They kept my precious plastic bottles after that and I am proud to say they have started water storage of their own. Recycle and preparedness all in one. One point I have to mention : You become a LOT less fussy about water quality when there really is none. We have started burying these bottles in holes in the ground. My oldest bottles are 4 years old and the water is still totally fresh. We found out the very hard way just how much water we used every day.

    Reply
  50. We have our water storage for emergency preparation organized in layers. Layer 1 is 220 gallons of water in food grade 55 gallon drums. Layer 2 are two of these water bobs…if the water is still running, we'll fill 'em up. Layer 3 is the water heater. If we can use any two layers in an emergency, our household is good for around 30 days. Suspect our home location won't hold up for a disaster lasting longer…but our preps for that are another story.

    So the water bobs are part of our plan. Seems like a good idea to me. But they're only part of our plan…we have the other water sources too.

    Reply

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